Elections Supervisor on Voter Registration process

first_img Related Items:dudley lewis, voter registration Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 09 Nov 2015 – Lots of voter registration talk now as time winds down to take part in one of the most important constitutional opportunities for the citizenry of any country; the right to vote. Dudley Lewis, the Elections Supervisor said although the Electors Register will not be published until next year March, it is November 30, 2015 – just 15 business days away that sees the new register officially closed. Lewis clarified that “Eligible voters on the present Register of Electors do not need to re-apply to be included in the new one, they will be automatically included unless they notify the Elections Office that they have changed their name or place of residence, or no longer meet eligibility criteria.” One dis-qualifier is if one has been living outside of the country for the past year or two. General Elections are due to happen in 2016, as next year will mark four years since the Rufus Ewing led administration was elected at the polls. Those who are bonafide Turks and Caicos Islanders, but who will not be 18 years old before November 30 may still have a chance to make the register said Lewis: “anyone who attains the age of 18 and anyone who has been granted status as a Turks and Caicos Islander after November 30 who applies will be added to the register provided it is not less than 30 days before the date of the poll.”Getting registered, explained Lewis first involves filling out a voter registration form which is available at the relevant government offices on all islands in the TCI. 2015/2016 Electors list increases by less than 500 Amendments will mean less time at polls, next TCI General Election TCI Preliminary 2016/17 Electors List to be Publish Friday January 29, 2016 Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Note 10 Plus specs vs iPhone XS Max OnePlus 7 Pro and

first_img iPhone XS Max Tags Water-resistant (IP68); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging; Face ID; Memoji No 12GB Note 10 Plus vs. iPhone XS Max, OnePlus 7 Pro and LG V50 specs £1,099 (64GB), £1,249 (256GB), £1,449 (512GB) All phones have their strengths and weaknesses, at least on paper. For instance, the Note 10 Plus has the biggest screen and battery, the iPhone XS Max has secure face scanning, the OnePlus 7 Pro is the least expensive of the bunch and the LG V50 has the sharpest display. To see how the devices stack up against one another, check out our chart, which compares each phone spec-by-spec. OnePlus 7 Pro Connector 256GB, 512GB No 6.5-inch Super Retina OLED; 2,688×1,242 pixels Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier 157.5×77.4×7.7 mm $669 (128GB/6GB); $699 (256GB/8GB); $749 (256GB/12GB) Apple A12 Bionic 458 ppi reading • Note 10 Plus specs vs. iPhone XS Max, OnePlus 7 Pro and LG V50 ThinQ Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10 Plus look incredible 498 ppi No Expandable storage 128GB, 256GB 2.84GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 See All 6.2×3.0x.3 in 6.26×3.0x0.33 in 6.67-inch AMOLED; 3,120×1,440 pixels 64GB, 256GB, 512GB 62 Photos Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 processor, or Samsung Exynos 9825 7.27 oz; 206g 162.6 x 75.9 x 8.8 mm Price off-contract (USD) Galaxy Note and Note 10 Plus are here to wow you 159.1×76.1x 8.3mm iOS 12 162.3×77.2×7.9 mm Storage $1,099 (64GB), $1,249 (256GB), $1,449 (512GB) Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus 6.4-inch OLED; 3,120×1,440 pixels Processor Price (GBP) 516 ppi Battery 6.39×3.04×0.31 in Price (AUD) Video capture Samsung Event 4K Lightning Post a comment 48-megapixel (standard), 8-megapixel (telephoto), 16-megapixel (ultra wide-angle) 2TB In-screen LG Samsung Apple OnePlus 10-megapixel Android 9.0 Pie Android 9.0 Pie Weight (Ounces, Grams) 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 16-megapixel (ultra wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto), 3D depth (HQVGA) Now playing: Watch this: 564 ppi 3,174-mAh (unconfirmed by Apple)center_img • 6GB, 8GB, 12GB 6.46 oz.; 183g 8-megapixel (standard), 5-megapixel (wide) In-screen AU$1,799 (64GB), AU$2,049 (256GB), AU$2,369 (512GB) Starts at £69 (EE) None (Face ID) Dimensions (Millimeters) Converted: AU$962 (128GB/6GB); AU$1,006 (256GB/8GB); AU$1,076 (256GB/12GB) Apple Starts at AU$1,728 4,000-mAh Fingerprint sensor 6.8-inch Dynamic AMOLED; 3,040×1,440 pixels Dimensions (Inches) Share your voice Back 12-megapixel (standard), 16-megapixel (wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto) Wireless PowerShare; water resistant (IP68); S Pen stylus with Bluetooth connectivity and Air actions The Note 10 with the iPhone XS Max. Sarah Tew/CNET At a Brooklyn press event on Aug. 7, Samsung announced the Note 10, Note 10 Plus and Note 10 5G, three phones that have big screens, an embedded S Pen stylus and multiple rear cameras. Since the first Galaxy Note launch in 2011, the Note phones have stood out as part of Samsung’s ultraluxe line. The devices are usually outfitted with a steep price and top-of-the-line hardware, and represent the best of Samsung’s best.   But Samsung is not alone. With phone sales slumping globally, the crowded phone industry is more competitive than ever. Samsung’s main rival, Apple, has the iPhone XS Max, a phone with a brilliant 6.5-inch screen, a superfast processor and excellent dual rear cameras. On the Android side is the OnePlus 7 Pro, a cheaper phone that ultimately earned CNET’s Editors’ Choice award in June. Lastly, LG, which is based in South Korea along with Samsung, released the V50 ThinQ 5G. The V50 features a headphone jack, five cameras and next-gen 5G connectivity. USB-C USB-C Headphone jack Mobile software No USB-C Up to 1TB Special features LG V50 ThinQ 5G Android 9.0 Pie 90Hz display, pop-up selfie camera, dual-SIM, Warp Charging 5G connectivity; water resistant (IP68); wireless charging, Quick Charge 3.0 6.91 oz; 196g $1,099 128GB 4,300-mAh $1,000 (Verizon); $1,152 (Sprint) Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demand 4K 7-megapixel Display size, resolution 0 RAM 4,000-mAh Mobile Phones 6GB 4K Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it 12-megapixel (standard), 12-megapixel (telephoto) TBD 16-megapixel Front-facing camera 7.3oz; 208g Not disclosed Yes 10:55 6.4×2.99×0.35 in Camera TBD No 4K Pixel density £649 (128GB/6GB); £699 (256GB/8GB); £799 (256GB/12GB)last_img read more

RBI Holds Rate Says Tracking Govt Fiscal Consolidation and Inflation

first_imgReutersThe Reserve Bank of India (RBI) chose to hold interest rates steady at 7.75%, leaving the possibility of a rate cut after the Narendra Modi government presents its first full budget on 28 February. The RBI last cut rates by 25 basis points about three weeks ago.The central bank has cut its statutory lending ratio (SLR) by 50 basis points, freeing up banks to increase their lending. Statutory lending is the amount of bonds the lenders must set aside, which now comes down to 21.5% of deposits.The RBI asked the banks to use the headroom provided by the cut in SLR to increase their lending to productive sector on competitive terms, to support investment and growth.RBI also announced initiatives to develop markets, including allowing foreign institutional investors to reinvest government bond coupons even after exhausting the investment threshold limit.According to a Reuters poll, most economists expected the RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan to hold rates steady, and to cut rates only after the fiscal budget to be presented by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley on 28 February, provided the fiscal deficit also sees a decline.RBI sought more comfort on inflation continuing to ease and noted that it would await action from the government regarding the nation’s finances.With no new ‘substantial’ developments on the disinflationary process or on the fiscal outlook since January this year, the RBI rationalised it was appropriate to maintain rates.With oil prices tumbling and inflation receding, RBI cut rates in a surprise move on 15 January, by 25 basis points. The investor community is looking forward to the RBI cutting rates to help boost loan off-take and to make cost of funds cheaper. Markets are factoring in further rate cuts over the rest of the year and for inflation to continue to remain subdued, helped by fall in oil prices and bigger-than-expected falls in domestic vegetables and fruits.Consumer prices rose by 5% in December 2014, within the RBI target of 6% by January 2016.last_img read more

Trump rails at health care debacle

first_imgUS President Donald Trump speaks about the Senate health care bill during a lunch with members of the US military in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPAn angry President Donald Trump railed Tuesday against dissenters in his party who dashed his months-long effort to dismantle his predecessor’s landmark health care law, as moderates balked at the latest Republican plan to scrap Obamacare.With several efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) now squashed, the Senate’s top Republican said he would forge ahead with what could be a last-gasp vote—on a new plan to kill off most of the 2010 reforms of Trump’s predecessor without a replacement at the ready.Four Republicans had lined up against Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s earlier health overhaul, flatlining it in the chamber, where the party could afford only two defectors in order to get the measure passed.McConnell announced a fresh effort aimed at repealing Obamacare now and crafting a replacement later. But that too ran into opposition from at least three Republicans who refused to support repealing the law without a suitable fix at the ready.The Republican leader nonetheless prepared to force a vote to see where his members stood on the repeal-only measure.“That’s a vote I think we’re very likely to have in the very near future,” McConnell told reporters.No date was given, but number two Republican John Cornyn said he expected it this week.The dramatic implosion effectively means that Trump, who marks his first half-year in office Thursday, has no major legislative victory in hand, squandering months of political capital.Trump fired off a morning tweet storm complaining about how he was “let down” by Democrats “and a few Republicans” opposed to the repeal.He had campaigned relentlessly on a pledge to abolish most of the ACA, proclaiming at an October campaign rally that it would be “so easy” to immediately repeal and replace the law.But he has run into the uncompromising reality of American politics: even with a president’s party enjoying a majority in both chambers, crafting and passing landmark legislation can be perilous in the US Congress.The White House insisted that success remained within reach, with deputy spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders saying “we are not done with the health care battle.”But Trump said he was “disappointed,” and repeatedly offered that now it would be easier to just “let Obamacare fail.”He also stressed he wanted nothing to do with the blame for the collapse.“We’re not going to own it. I’m not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it,” he said.“We’ll let Obamacare fail and then the Democrats are going to come to us” looking to work on a solution.‘Time to start over’McConnell’s new bid would repeal much of Obamacare outright, but with a two-year delay of implementation, in order to allow Congress time to craft a replacement.A straight repeal bill passed Congress in 2015. That was during Obama’s presidency, and Republicans knew they would pay no political price for their votes, as Obama vetoed the measure.It is no longer a dress rehearsal, and some Republicans are clearly concerned they would be on the hook for any ensuing disruption to the health care system.Two years ago, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office warned that simply repealing Obamacare would essentially kick 18 million people off health care in the first year compared to current law, a figure that would balloon to 32 million by 2026.That is far worse than the 22 million that the CBO forecast would lose coverage under the latest repeal-and-replace legislation.With a number of Senate Republican moderates voicing concern about how the latest bill could adversely impact millions of people insured through Medicaid, the health coverage program for the poor and the disabled, McConnell’s bid floundered.“I cannot vote to repeal Obamacare without a replacement plan that addresses my concerns and the needs of West Virginians,” Senator Shelley Moore Capito said in a statement.Her state has significant numbers of residents on Medicaid.Another Republican opposed to the new plan, Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, acknowledged that McConnell had the nearly impossible task of coralling enough votes from his caucus’s rival conservative and moderate factions.“The majority leader is trying to keep all the frogs in the wheelbarrow, and it’s a tough job,” Murkowski said.While Democrats celebrated, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer extended an olive branch to his Republican rivals and encouraged them to work with Democrats to improve Obamacare.“It’s time to move on. It’s time to start over” on health care, he said.Meanwhile a bipartisan group of 11 governors urged the Senate to “immediately reject” the repeal-only effort and work with state executives on bettering the current system.“The best next step is for both parties to come together and do what we can all agree on: fix our unstable insurance markets,” said the governors, who included Ohio’s John Kasich, a 2016 Republican presidential hopeful, and Democrat Terry McAuliffe of Virginia.last_img read more

Energy Sector Pushes Back Against New York Citys Climate Change Lawsuit

first_img Share Bruce Gordon via FlickrOil and gas development seen in the West Texas Permian Basin.Energy companies targeted in a lawsuit by the City of New York for their role in the world’s changing climate are criticizing the city’s legal action, saying it’s the wrong avenue for addressing the problem.On Wednesday, the city announced a lawsuit seeking damages from five major energy companies “for the billions of dollars the City will spend to protect New Yorkers from the effects of climate change.” The city also announced a goal to divest from fossil fuels roughly $5 billion of its pension funds within five years.The lawsuit targets Houston-based ConocoPhillips, along with BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Chevron and ExxonMobil.ConocoPhillips told News 88-7 its practice is not to comment on pending litigation. In statements, other companies acknowledged the risks of climate change, but painted the lawsuit as unproductive.“Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a global issue and requires global participation and actions,” read a statement from ExxonMobil. “Lawsuits of this kind — filed by trial attorneys against an industry that provides products we all rely upon to power the economy and enable our domestic life – simply do not do that.”In a statement, Shell called climate change a “complex societal challenge” that instead of being addressed by the courts, should be dealt with through “low-carbon choices” driven by “sound government policy and cultural change.”Chevron, also in a statement, dismissed the lawsuit as “factually and legally meritless,” saying it “will do nothing to address the serious issue of climate change.”Victor Flatt, head of the Environment, Energy and Natural Resources Center at the University of Houston, said the lawsuit is the latest in a string of similar climate-related litigation aimed at the energy sector. But, he noted, New York’s case goes beyond similar challenges like those from cities in California.“It’s the first public organization that has sued and really brought up allegations not just that greenhouse gases have caused harm, but that the companies responsible for these amounts of greenhouse gases purposefully hid what they were doing and had bad intent,” Flatt said. “It shows that this drumbeat of litigation is just going to continue.”Correction: a previous version of this story stated that New York City announced a goal to divest from fossil fuels its $189 billion in pension funds within five years. In fact, the goal is to divest roughly $5 billion, which is the amount the city’s pension funds hold in fossil fuel companies. last_img read more