Aaron Rodgers Cant Be Stopped By A Pass Rush Anymore

2011Mike Vick29.146.42.43.71.3 2011Tim Tebow37.1%17.22.94.92.0 2013Russell Wilson36.739.02.73.91.2 12016Jameis Winston34.9%80.7 2012Nick Foles26.210.12.54.01.5 2015Aaron Rodgers32.434.72.54.01.5 2016Aaron Rodgers29.471.82.64.01.4 2012Ben Roethlisberger24.744.92.54.01.5 72016Dak Prescott29.958.4 82015Tyrod Taylor31.757.9 92014Carson Palmer27.452.8 102013Ryan Fitzpatrick23.952.5 RANKSEASONPLAYERPRESSURE %QBR SEASONPLAYERPRESSURE %QBRIN POCKETBEFORE PASSSCRAMBLING SECONDS Rodgers’s performance through the regular season and two postseason games this year has been exceptional. His 71.8 QBR when pressured this season is the fourth-highest since 2009, and he’s shown no signs of slowing down. On Sunday, Rodgers was pressured on 18 of 51 dropbacks, and while he was sacked three times and gave up an interception, he went 7 for 14 for 149 yards, including the 36 that brought the Packers into field goal position. His unadjusted QBR actually went up on these plays, from 79.4 on plays where he wasn’t pressured to 89.7 on plays where he was.We only have QB pressure data going back to 2009, so that table isn’t exactly a complete survey of the situation. But six of the best eight individual seasons of QBs performing under pressure have come in the last two years.A few possible explanations for that: First, random noise is always a possibility. Second, something in the collection or interpretation of the pressure numbers may have changed over the years. (I asked around at Stats & Info about this, and the folks there said nothing changed under the hood, but they did note that the stat doesn’t differentiate between duress that comes at the beginning of a play, before a QB escapes to relative safety, and duress that comes just as a QB throws.)One more caveat: Different shops have different ways of defining “pressure,” so numbers can shift slightly from site to site, but the unifying thread among all the methods is that the QB has to be affected by the rush. So some plays that simply require the QB to step up in the pocket to avoid the rush may be left out of the overall tally. That would seemingly underrepresent mainstays of passing-leader charts such as Drew Brees or Tom Brady, who excel at beating the blitz by throwing the ball before pressure can arrive.So if the Geriatric All-Pro wing isn’t cracking the pass rush, it should be obvious who is — the guys who can move. Here’s a table showing QBs since 2011 who created the most time outside the pocket. I took the average time to throw and subtracted time in the pocket, leaving us with those magical few seconds when a player such as Rodgers or Russell Wilson or Colin Kaepernick is rolling around the edge looking for a target: 2012Colin Kaepernick25.134.92.54.11.6 2013Terrelle Pryor37.211.72.64.41.8 2012Robert Griffin III25.511.92.74.21.5 2012Russell Wilson31.932.72.84.41.6 2012Aaron Rodgers23.415.52.64.21.6 32013Josh McCown27.673.8 2014Colin Kaepernick31.524.42.44.01.6 2015Russell Wilson36.126.52.44.01.5 22015Jay Cutler30.975.0 2013Colin Kaepernick27.217.62.64.01.3 2013Aaron Rodgers25.019.42.54.01.5 Source: ESPN Stats & Info Group 2011Ben Roethlisberger25.439.32.63.81.2 Source: ESPN Stats & Information Group QBs under pressure, regular season and playoffs 2011-16 2011Aaron Rodgers22.221.72.74.01.4 42016Aaron Rodgers28.871.8 There are two types of quarterbacks who consistently create significant amounts of time between when they break the pocket and when they throw the ball: the bootleg and read-option acolytes and the guys who are (and must be) good at running for their lives. Along with a slightly younger version of Ben Roethlisberger and an always-battered Russell Wilson, Rodgers is one of the few QBs on that list who combine out-of-pocket moves with excellence at the more traditional in-pocket throws.But Rodgers has always been able to buy time once the pocket breaks down, and it’s only recently that he’s turned those moments of brilliance into sustained performance.Since the start of the 2014 season, Rodgers has thrown for 28 touchdowns and just five interceptions while under pressure. The league average over that span is 3.2 touchdowns per season to 3.2 interceptions. For the season, Rodgers’s QBR when he was pressured was 71.8, which would have put him ninth in the league on all plays, not just pressured ones.So the big question then: What did Rodgers change?Rodgers’s pressure numbers look very similar to his old ones on depth of pass, time to pass, and many other stats. The only difference by the numbers is that he appears to be completing more of the same passes he’s been throwing for years.A critical part of this improvement seems to be that Rodgers is even more comfortable getting out on the edge early in his progressions. Here’s a play against the Vikings in Week 7 of 2011, Rodgers’s first MVP season:He looks a like a traditional quarterback, going through his progressions until the pocket finally folds, and he busts out and finds an open man.And now here he is this season:In part out of necessity, Rodgers no longer bounces around the pocket, or slides around blockers while keeping his feet set. These days, he often makes one or two reads and books it to the outside, where he essentially sets up a secondary pocket. It’s almost a bizarro version of the simplified offense many young mobile QBs run, in which they make one read and then bolt if their man isn’t open.Who knows if Rodgers will keep this up. Maybe this is unsustainable. Maybe the magic outside the pocket really is just fortuitous but still random chance converging in one season. But Rodgers has had enough success this season that if he keeps on doing what he’s doing, it’ll be hard to argue it’s just luck, no matter how unlikely it might seem.Check out our latest NFL playoff predictions. 2016Tyrod Taylor35.551.12.63.91.3 2011Joe Flacco22.817.12.53.81.3 62009Peyton Manning15.761.2 2011Kevin Kolb33.62.42.43.91.5 52015Ryan Fitzpatrick22.571.5 2014Russell Wilson39.233.72.54.01.5 A certain number of things that happen during a football game come down to skill, and a certain number to luck, and it’s important to be able to tell one from the other. Aaron Rodgers dropping deep in the pocket on a free play and rifling a 34-yard touchdown pass to a wide-open Richard Rodgers, under-throwing him but threading it precisely between linebacker Sean Lee’s outstretched arm and his earhole against the Cowboys last weekend? That takes some baseline NFL skills, but mostly it’s a bad pass getting a lucky break. But Aaron Rodgers slipping the pocket, rolling left, pausing, waiting for his receivers to come back across the field, and hitting Jared Cook for a 36-yard catch that was inbounds by a toenail and set up the game-winning field goal? Now that’s a little bit of luck and a whole lot of skill.Aaron Rodgers is unusually good when pressure comes his way. One of the bedrock principles of defense in the NFL is that pressuring the quarterback works. It worked on Tom Brady and the 18-0 Patriots in 2008, and God knows it worked on Cam Newton and the Panthers in Super Bowl 50. Get to the quarterback, the thinking goes, and you’re in good shape, failing a stroke of luck or the spectacular. But these days there’s a group of quarterbacks, Rodgers included, who are defying that conventional wisdom.Since 2009, the league average QBR1I’m using the “raw” version of QBR for this post, since Total QBR isn’t calculated at the split-level. The raw version is just the Total QBR number before it’s adjusted for strength of opponent. on plays with QB pressure is just 18.5, according to ESPN Stats & Information — just barely better than the worst quarterbacking season of the century, Jimmy Clausen’s catastrophe in 2010, which came in at 14.5 QBR. This season, QB performance has seen a modest bump to 29.3 — better, but still not very good. The notable difference, however, is now there are a few quarterbacks who are finding ways to thrive.Here’s a chart showing the quarterbacks since 2009 who performed best on plays flagged as QB pressures: read more

Europes hotly debated copyright revamp is more than a meme killer

first_img Now playing: Watch this: 1:04 EU Parliament vote means your memes are safe… for now Share your voice First they came for the privacy violations, then they came for the memes. The European Union is trying to pass a hotly debated law on copyright. The European Copyright Directive has been years in the making, and on Tuesday, March 26, the European Parliament is due to vote on the final version of it.Companies including Google, along with free speech advocates and prominent figures within the EU, have opposed parts of the draft legislation. The contentious nature of the legislation saw it morph through multiple iterations before the different EU institutions agreed on a version after three days of talks in France.On June 20, 2018, the European Parliament’s legal affairs committee voted to approve the draft legislation, but then a couple of weeks later, on July 5, the Parliament as a whole rejected the measure. That was hardly the end of the matter, and the individual EU institutions followed up with their own input.Those votes happened just weeks after Europe’s last big piece of internet-related legislation — the General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) — kicked in. 5 Tags Culture Internet Services Both the Copyright Directive and GDPR could dramatically affect and change things about the internet as we know it. But they also differ significantly, not just in scope, but also in how they’re viewed and received by the world beyond Brussels. GDPR has forced internet companies to scramble to fall in line with the new policy, but the privacy protections it promises internet users mean it’s generally thought of as a consumer-friendly effort. Some hail it as evidence that the EU is leading the way when it comes to regulating the internet. The pending Copyright Directive, however, is meeting with the opposite reaction. What is the European Copyright Directive and why are people against it? The EU Copyright Directive — or to give its full name, the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market — is Europe’s attempt to harmonize copyright laws across all member states. The last EU-wide copyright law was put in place in 2001, when the internet was a dramatically different place to how it is today. It’s designed to update the law and make it more relevant to the internet we know and love now, as well as to anticipate change down the line. The legislation, however, is vague — one of the criticisms of it — in terms of what actually needs to change and how it’ll be upheld. But there are two sections in particular that have drawn criticism for being overly harsh: Article 13, and to a lesser extent, Article 11. The impact, critics say, could mean a substantially more closed internet of the future. Who’s in favor of the directive? Alex Voss, rapporteur of the European Parliament for the copyright directive, for one. He suggested the law and believes its criticisms are highly exaggerated. Many members of the European Parliament also support the overhaul of EU copyright law. How many exactly will be determined when it’s put to a vote. Pirate Party MEP Julia Reda suggested alternatives to both Article 11 and Article 13, saying they would “fairly balance the interests of different groups without compromising on fundamental rights.” What’s Article 13? Article 13 is the part of the directive that dictates how copyrighted content — including TV shows, films, videos and pictures — is shared on the internet. It dictates that anyone sharing copyrighted content must get permission from rights owners, or at least have made the best possible effort to get permission, before doing so.It’d force all online platforms to police and prevent the uploading of copyrighted content, or make people seek the correct licenses to post that content. For the most part this would mean filters that check content as it’s uploaded would be mandatory for platforms including Facebook, Instagram, GitHub, Reddit and Tumblr, but also many much smaller platforms.YouTube already uses such a system — called Content ID — to protect copyright infringement, but the technology to do this is extremely expensive and has taken over 11 years to build and refine. Who has a problem with it and why? The concerns about Article 13 are wide-ranging, including unease about the cost of compliance for smaller companies, and out-and-out censorship of the internet. In a letter addressed to the president of the EP, Antonio Tajani, around 70 internet luminaries, including Vint Cerf and Tim Berners-Lee, expressed their concern that the provision could cause “substantial harm” to the internet. “Article 13 takes an unprecedented step towards the transformation of the internet from an open platform for sharing and innovation, into a tool for the automated surveillance and control of its users,” they said. An organized campaign against Article 13 warns that it’d affect everything from memes to code, remixes to livestreaming. Almost 400,000 people have so far signed a Change.org petition against the provision. The Max Planck Institute, a nonprofit group, notes that Article 13 could threaten freedom of expression and information as enshrined in the European Charter of Human Rights. What’s Article 11? A second part of the draft legislation, Article 11, is also raising eyebrows. This section stipulates that companies like Google, Facebook and Microsoft may have to pay publishers for showing snippets of news articles. Who has a problem with it and why? The objections to Article 11 are less vocal, but they’re out there nonetheless. It’s unclear what exactly would have to be licensed (snippets? headlines? links themselves?) so the jury is out on how much of an impact it might have. “Platforms unable or unwilling to pay licensing fees would need to shut down or disallow users from sharing links with snippets,” said Pirate Party MEP Julia Reda. There are fears it could outlaw news aggregators as we know them or even prevent any sites other than giants like Google, which could afford a license, from linking to articles at all. How will this affect Facebook and other social media companies? The law would force social media platforms to take more direct responsibility for policing uploaded content. Big tech companies will likely put their own, costly solutions in place for doing this. Smaller companies would likely use a more centralized platform. It’d also prevent social platforms from showing any kind of “snippet” of news stories, making it ultimately harder to share and link to content. How will this affect me, an EU resident? Everything you upload onto the internet will be checked for copyright beforehand, so this could mean no more making memes or edits for your favorite fan Tumblr, among many other things. It could also mean the end of some of your favorite news aggregation tools and apps. When you click on a link, you may have little clue ahead of time what lies beyond. These are just some of the possibilities, but because of how vague the law is, it’s hard to see how it might be upheld when the time comes. How will this affect me, a non-EU resident? Each territory is governed by its own copyright laws, so unless the directive causes the big internet companies to make some huge, fundamental changes, you might not be directly affected. The internet may not have as much content generated from within Europe, however, so if you’re a fan of British humor or Europe’s take on popular memes, your experience of being online may be the poorer for it. Will the directive definitely pass into law? It’s too early to say whether the Copyright Directive will pass. The July 5 vote by the EU Parliament was a narrow one: 318 against, 278 in favor, with 31 abstentions.Now that the EU has agreed on a final text for the directive, the European Parliament will vote on the legislation. If it passes, it’ll come into force in each EU country over the next two years.Originally published June 22, 2018.Update July 5, 2018:  Added information about the vote in the European Parliament.Update Feb. 15, 2019: Added information about the upcoming vote in the European Parliament.Update March 25, 2019: Added further information about the upcoming vote. GDPR Legislation Privacy Facebook Commentslast_img read more

OYO in talks to buy Keys Hotels from USbased private equity firm

first_img Hotel Collapse In Peru Kills At Least 15 During Wedding OYO Rooms founder Ritesh AgarwalOYO Hotels and Homes is in talks with US-based Berggruen Holdings, to acquire their company Keys Hotels in India. Berggruen Holdings, a $2 billion private equity and venture capital firm, is the owner of Berggruen Hotels in India, which operates business hotels under the Keys brand. The Keys Hotels brand, established in 2006, currently has a portfolio of about 20 owned, managed and franchised hotels across the country in cities such as Mumbai, Chennai and Mahabaleshwar. Out of its entire portfolio of hotels, Keys Hotels owns seven hotels totalling 1,000 rooms while another 13 are managed and franchised.OYO has approached Berggruen Holdings and due diligence has been carried out. A lot of investment has gone in Keys, but the business has been languishing. The valuations have to make sense. Keys was looking at a valuation of about $ 125 millionKeys Hotels, which has a debt of around 1.6 billion rupees, had been seeking buyers for the past few years. “OYO has approached Berggruen Holdings and due diligence has been carried out. A lot of investment has gone in Keys, but the business has been languishing. The valuations have to make sense. Keys was looking at a valuation of about $ 125 million,” an unnamed source told The Economic Times. Planning to rent an OYO room? Well, you may be on the radar of the government/agenciesKVN Rohit/IBTimes IndiaErnst & Young is the intermediary transaction advisor for the deal, media reports said. If the deal materialises, it would be the fourth acquisition in a year for Softbank-backed OYO. The hospitality major had acquired Chennai-based serviced apartment company Novascotia Boutique Homes in March last year, following it up with the buyouts of internet-of-things technology venture AblePlus and online marketplace for wedding venues and vendors, Weddingz.Building capabilities”Our acquisition strategy is targeted towards acquiring entities that assist us in building capabilities, we do not have any further announcement to make at the moment” an OYO spokesperson told the financial newspaper. However, Anshu Sarin, chief executive officer of Berggruen Hotels, denied being aware of any discussions with OYO. IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:00/0:20Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:20?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Lately, Ritesh Agarwal-led OYO has been focusing on expanding its international presence, with a special focus on China. Globally, OYO is present in over 500 cities across eight countries – India, China, Malaysia, Nepal, UK, UAE, Indonesia, and the Philippines. As of December 2018, the company had 458,000 rooms across the world. Closelast_img read more