R5.4bn for criminal justice revamp

first_img11 February 2009 Efforts to review the forensic and investigative capacity of the South African Police Service are already under way, and together with enhanced technologies would give a welcome boost to the country’s fight against crime, he said during his 2009/10 Budget speech to Parliament in Cape Town on Wednesday. Finance Minister Trevor Manuel on Wednesday announced a R5.4-billion allocation for the overhaul of South Africa’s criminal justice system. Funding is also provided for additional policing capacity during the 2010 Fifa World Cup, for building new prisons and for implementing the Child Justice Bill. Source: BuaNews In his state of the nation address on Friday, President Kgalema Motlanthe said that crime remained a major source of insecurity for South Africans. “Daily experience, in poor and affluent neighbourhoods alike, is one of apprehension at the possibility of violent attack.” South Africa’s crime situation, Motlanthe said, pointed to weaknesses in building the bonds of community solidarity, weaknesses in the criminal justice system – from investigation of crimes to rehabilitation of offenders – as well as weaknesses in the efficiency of the court system, both in terms of technical and other infrastructure and management. The funds will also go towards increasing the number of police officials from 183 000 in 2008/09 to over 204 000 in 2011/12. Motlanthe said that while South Africa’s overall crime rate, having peaked in 2002, had consistently declined since then, it was still not dropping fast enough. “The fact that incidents of violent robberies in households and businesses have been on the increase, and crimes against women and children have not abated in any significant measure, is a matter of great concern,” he said during the opening of Parliament. “A further R5.4-billion is allocated to interventions aimed at improving criminal justice services, the creation of an integrated fingerprint and DNA database, improving detective capacity, [and] upgrading IT and telecommunications systems,” Manuel said.last_img read more

SA’s first grid-connected solar PV plant

first_img16 September 2013 Norway-based Scatec Solar announced on Monday that it had completed its 75-megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Kalkbult in the Northern Cape three months ahead of schedule, making it first project under South Africa’s renewable energy programme for private producers to be grid connected and operational. Scatec Solar was one of 28 independent power producers that signed contracts with the government late last year, in the first round of a programme that will see an initial 1 400 megawatts (MW) of renewable energy being added to South Africa’s energy mix, while bringing an estimated R47-billion in new investment into the country. The Department of Energy aims to bring 17 800 MW from renewable sources online by 2030. Scatec Solar has been awarded three projects with total capacity of 190 MW under the government’s programme. Construction of its next two projects, located in the Northern and Eastern Cape, has started and completion is expected by the middle of next year. The completed Kalkbult plant consists of more than 312 000 solar panels mounted on 156 kilometres of substructure, inverters, transformers and a sub-station. Kalkbult’s electricity will be sold to state company Eskom through a 20-year purchase agreement. According to Scatec Solar, the annual production of 135-million kWh will cover the electricity demand of 33 000 households, while reducing the country’s carbon dioxide emissions by almost 115 000 tons per year. “The South African authorities are committed to implementing an ambitious renewable energy programme, and we find great satisfaction in being able to contribute to its success through our own projects, which we have actively been developing in South Africa over the last four years,” Scatec Solar CEO Raymond Carlsen said in a statement on Monday. “This country boasts some of the best conditions for solar power in the world, and the annual output of 135-million kWh produced at the Kalkbult plant will benefit both the region and the local community in which we operate.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Why painkillers sometimes make the pain worse

first_img As prescribing skyrocketed, so did overdoses. U.S. deaths from prescription opioids have roughly quadrupled in the last 2 decades, reaching 21,000 in 2014. Making things worse, abundant prescription opioids have been diverted for recreational use, which has driven up rates of heroin addiction as users have sought cheaper or more accessible alternatives. Both prescription and illegal opioids kill when high doses slow breathing, especially when combined with alcohol or antianxiety drugs called benzodiazepines. “I’m not sure you could find an example of physicians doing more harm to human beings than we have achieved in our liberal opiate prescribing,” says David Clark, an anesthesiologist at Stanford.Mao and others wondered whether hyperalgesia was another important opioid side effect. People might be seeking a higher dose as drug-induced pain compounded the original pain, he thought. If so, doctors who ignore hyperalgesia might bump up the dose when the right decision was to reduce it. And when a patient tried to taper off a drug, a temporarily lowered pain threshold might make it harder for them to manage without it. “If they’re hyperalgesic, they can just go back to the drug again to feel okay,” says Jose Moron-Concepcion, a neuroscientist at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in Missouri.  The evidence for hyperalgesia is clearest in people taking extreme doses—for instance, in opioid abusers or terminal cancer patients managing severe pain. Surgical patients given large amounts of the opioid remifentanil have shown signs of hyperalgesia; they have larger areas of soreness around their wounds and seem predisposed to chronic pain following surgery. But what about patients who take lower doses of opioids daily over months or years to manage chronic pain? As a pain specialist at a large teaching hospital, Mao frequently encounters patients who can’t find relief from increasing opioid doses and who tell him that their pain has become worse—diffuse, nagging, and harder to pinpoint.But just how many people experience OIH, and at what opioid dose, is hard to say. The phenomenon can be very hard to distinguish from tolerance, when pain increases as the drug loses its effectiveness over time. (It’s also possible that a patient’s underlying condition has changed, or that the chronic pain itself has kicked their pain signaling into high gear.)Because diagnosing hyperalgesia can be a guessing game in the clinic, some researchers have turned to the lab. They have tried to document changing pain thresholds with quantitative sensory tests, like the so-called cold pressor test Hutchinson witnessed in the methadone patients in Australia, or contraptions that apply heat or pressure to the skin. But the studies have been small and the results inconsistent. “Nobody has actually shown that that particular stimulus in a human being is a valid way to say, ‘Yes, this person has become hyperalgesic,’” Angst says. In 2001, researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai reported that chronic morphine administration in rats activated glial cells called astrocytes in the spinal cord. Subsequent studies showed that inhibiting the inflammatory molecules released by glia could reverse hyperalgesia and tolerance in the rats. The results suggested that opioids may trigger glia to set off system-wide pain signaling that both counteracts the pain relief from the drug and makes the body generally more sensitive to pain.Many see dampening this inflammatory response as a promising way to fight hyperalgesia, because it would not interfere with opioids’ pain-relieving activity on neural receptors. Several efforts are underway. The San Diego, California–based biotech company MediciNova recently completed a phase II trial of a glia-inhibiting drug called ibudilast, already approved as an asthma treatment in Japan, to relieve pain and treat withdrawal in opioid abusers. A study led by researchers at Yale University is testing the antibiotic acne medication minocycline, which is also thought to block glial activation in the brain. And research spun out of neuroscientist Linda Watkins’s group at the University of Colorado in Boulder is testing a new pain drug that may tame glia in the spinal cord by blocking a signaling protein on their surface.If inflammation turns out to be a key driver of OIH, it might also point the way to a better test for the effect, says Lesley Colvin, a pain researcher at the University of Edinburgh. Markers of inflammation in the blood might correlate with clinical signs of hyperalgesia or declining pain thresholds on sensory tests. Colvin says she already sees strong evidence of hyperalgesia in high-dose opioid users at the clinic where she works. With so much at stake, she is eager to understand the phenomenon and how it might affect them long term. “Although it’s complicated,” she says, “that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try and work out the details.” V. Altounian/Science Martin Angst, anesthesio
logist and clinical pharmacologist, Stanford University Turning down the volume Animal studies have revealed several ways in which opioids may amplify pain signals in the central nervous system, suggesting targets for drugs that could counter the effect. Some studies of hyperalgesia rely on gradually heated probes applied to the skin. By Kelly ServickNov. 3, 2016 , 2:00 PM In 2006, for instance, a team that included Angst and Clark gave the cold pressor test to six people with chronic lower back pain before and after a monthlong course of morphine pills. After the drug treatment, the team found signs of hyperalgesia: On average, the subjects registered pain from the ice water about 2 seconds earlier, and removed their hands about 8 seconds earlier, than they had beforehand. But those results didn’t hold up in a larger group of 139 patients randomized to take opioids or placebo, nor did they appear in a different pain test that applied a gradually heated probe to the forearm. Then in 2013, a study with a different methodology seemed to confirm the effect. A research team in Israel reported evidence of hyperalgesia in 17 of 30 patients with radiating spinal nerve pain by asking them to rate the intensity of heat pain on a numerical scale before and after a 4-week course of hydromorphone. If you can’t reliably diagnose hyperalgesia, it’s hard to predict its long-term effects, says Michael Hooten, an anesthesiologist at the Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota. His group found evidence in 91 patients tapering off opioids that those whose doses were higher at the start, forcing them to make greater reductions over the 3-week program, had worse measures of heat pain hyperalgesia. But the team wasn’t able to track these patients long-term to ask the bigger questions: How long until their pain thresholds bounced back to normal? Do hyperalgesic patients who manage to quit taking opioids ultimately see improvements in pain? Are hyperalgesic patients more or less prone to addiction or relapse?For some, this lack of evidence makes research into hyperalgesia look like a dead end. “When I go to work every day, I don’t think about opioid-induced hyperalgesia,” says Gary Bennett, a pain researcher at the University of California in San Diego. “We know that it’s real. We don’t know how important it is, and it’s really, really hard to answer that question, so let’s move on.” Related Article Could pot help solve the U.S. opioid epidemic? Why painkillers sometimes make the pain worse Your biology fights back and says, ‘I’m blindfolded to pain by all these chemicals. I need to be able to sense pain again.’ Matthew Rakola Paradoxical as it may seem, OIH makes evolutionary sense. “Nature didn’t come up with pain just to torture mankind,” says Martin Angst, an anesthesiologist and clinical pharmacologist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. Pain causes us to recoil from a hot stove and to stay off an injured leg while it heals. And when it’s crucial that we temporarily ignore pain—say, when we run on that injured leg to evade a charging lion—the body has a way of numbing it, in part by releasing its own opioids. These natural molecules bind to receptors on neurons to block pain signals and activate reward centers in the brain. But doses of prescription opioids are orders of magnitude higher than our endogenous levels, Angst says. Confronted by these, “your biology fights back and says, ‘I’m blindfolded to pain by all these chemicals. I need to be able to sense pain again.’”Mao was among the first to delve into potential mechanisms of OIH in an animal model. In 1994, while at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond,  he and his colleagues showed that after 8 days of spinal morphine injections, rats were quicker to pull their paws away from a gradually heated glass surface. The animals’ baseline pain threshold had changed, and the effect was something more than tolerance, in which the body requires increasing doses of a drug to get the same effect. In this case, a higher dose could actually increase sensitivity to pain. The researchers found they could reverse the hyperalgesic effect by blocking certain receptors on neurons in the animals’ spinal cord. These N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors pick up chemical signals—notably an excitatory molecule called glutamate—released by sensory neurons projecting from the skin and organs, and transmit pain signals up to the brain. Researchers already knew that even without opioids, some people with chronic pain from nerve damage or fibromyalgia, for example, experience hyperalgesia when normal pain signaling gets reinforced and amplified over time. It appeared that, at least in animals, opioids had a similar effect.By 2000, Mao was turning his attention to patients, and the population of opioid users was expanding. Doctors had begun to consider the drugs relatively safe options for managing chronic pain. With the release and aggressive marketing of the long-acting narcotic OxyContin in 1996, a class of drugs that had largely been reserved for cancer patients was becoming a go-to treatment for conditions such as lower back pain. Related Special Issue The future of pain research Mark Hutchinson could read the anguish on the participants’ faces in seconds. As a graduate student at the University of Adelaide in Australia in the late 1990s, he helped with studies in which people taking methadone to treat opioid addiction tested their pain tolerance by dunking a forearm in ice water. Healthy controls typically managed to stand the cold for roughly a minute. Hutchinson himself, “the young, cocky, Aussie bloke chucking my arm in the water,” lasted more than 2 minutes. But the methadone patients averaged only about 15 seconds.“These aren’t wimps. These people are injecting all sorts of crazy crap into their arms. … But they were finding this excruciating,” Hutchinson says. “It just fascinated me.” The participants were taking enormous doses of narcotics. How could they experience such exaggerated pain?The experiment was Hutchinson’s first encounter with a perplexing phenomenon called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). At high doses, opioid painkillers actually seem to amplify pain by changing signaling in the central nervous system, making the body generally more sensitive to painful stimuli. “Just imagine if all the diabetic medications, instead of decreasing blood sugar, increased blood sugar,” says Jianren Mao, a physician and pain researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston who has studied hyperalgesia in rodents and people for more than 20 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But how prevalent hyperalgesia is, and whether it plays a role in the U.S. epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose, is unclear. A lack of reliable testing methods and a series of contradictory papers have created believers and skeptics. A few researchers, like Mao, think hyperalgesia is an underappreciated puzzle piece in the opioid epidemic—a force that can pile on pain, drive up doses, and make it harder for chronic users to come off their drugs. Some of those researchers are looking for ways to turn down hyperalgesia, to help patients function on lower doses of their oxycodone, for example, or make it easier to taper off it altogether. Others see OIH as an oddity in the literature—real, and a powerful clue to the workings of  pain pathways, but unlikely to tighten the grip of opioids on most patients. Hutchinson thinks the majority of physicians are either unaware of hyperalgesia or unconvinced of its importance. “I think if you surveyed prescribers of opioids, they would be divided probably 60–40.” Mao isn’t ready to move on. He believes the risk of hyperalgesia should motivate doctors to try tapering patients off their opioids when their pain worsens without an obvious cause. But in his experience, only about a third of chronic pain patients are willing to try that. So he’s hoping for a different solution: a drug that targets the mechanisms behind hyperalgesia and that might be given alongside an opioid, either when it’s first prescribed or when a doctor suspects OIH. Mao is recruiting patients for clinical trials to test two candidate drugs. One is ketamine, an anesthetic that blocks NMDA receptors. The other, guanfacine, is currently used to treat high blood pressure and is thought to keep sensory neurons from releasing glutamate into the spinal cord. A team led by Peggy Compton of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., meanwhile, is investigating a pain and antiseizure drug called gabapentin that may block neural transmission to reduce excessive pain signals. Other groups are attacking opioid side effects, including hyperalgesia, from a very different angle. In the early 2000s, researchers began exploring the role of glia, star-shaped immune cells in the brain and spinal cord, which were traditionally thought to function as mere “housekeepers,” offering structural support for neurons and removing debris. But when the immune system becomes activated in response to an illness or injury, glia in regions associated with pain processing seem to take on another role: They release inflammatory molecules that interact with nearby neurons to amplify pain signals. last_img read more

‘Salman Khan is the only actor who dares to be different’

first_imgSameera ReddyState of Affairs It is evident from your story that Punjab and Kerala have topped the list again because of their emphasis on what they are good at-agriculture and education (“North South Lead”, August 16). Transparency and good governance are the keys to being a good state. K. CHIDANAND,Sameera ReddyState of AffairsIt is evident from your story that Punjab and Kerala have topped the list again because of their emphasis on what they are good at-agriculture and education (“North South Lead”, August 16). Transparency and good governance are the keys to being a good state. K. CHIDANAND KUMAR, BangaloreDespite the fact that different states have bagged awards for development in some sector or the other, not a single state has attained self-sufficiency in infrastructure development. Had they done so India would have been ranked first in the comity of developing nations. S. NAGARATNAM, MumbaiThe left parties have always been critical of the policies and programmes of other parties but your survey shows that Left ruled West Bengal is lagging behind in almost all parameters with an overall rating of 14 among the big states. The Left does not have any moral right to preach to anyone else. They should set their own affairs in order first. M.M. GURBAXANI, BangaloreKerala has never tried to shed its post-independence slumber on the economic front even though it has taken enviable care of education and health. It should focus more on sustainable and growth-oriented economic ventures with employment generation within the state rather than depend on overseas dollars and dinars. ANIL THOMAS, ChennaiYour story should be an eye-opener for states like Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Lagging way behind on almost all socio-economic fronts, these states’ performances have hit rock bottom. Governance is conspicuous by its absence. Illiteracy and poverty are all-pervading. How long will these states be content to be mocked at as laggards of democracy? ALOK SRIVASTAVA, DelhiYou have missed some vital parameters like economic disparity, employment and growth of population while conducting your survey. All these factors have a lot of impact on the social and economic life of the people. Even the UN and other international research organisations take them into consideration while conducting studies. SURESH SURATWALA, MumbaiYour otherwise comprehensive report missed out two important factors- sustainable environment and ecological balance. Aren’t fresh air and clean drinking water important? Similarly cheaper and cleaner energy sources would attract investments and might be an answer to the soaring LPG and petroleum prices. YASH TOKARSI JAIN, on e-mailKerala cannot be considered a progressive state by any yardstick. A state that does not allow any industry to develop even during these times of liberalisation has nothing to do with any kind of progress. Nani Palkhivala had rightly said that social justice, when not accompanied by economic growth, is meaningless. T.S. PATTABHI RAMAN, on e-mailHaving a stable government does not necessarily mean that the state will witness economic progress. Had that been the case states like Bihar, where the RJD has been ruling for the past 14 years, andWest Bengal, where the Left Front has been in power for 27 years, would have prospered like Punjab and Kerala. RAJIB SARMA, on e-mailYour survey has many contradictions. Bihar is ranked last in health but in life expectancy and infant mortality the state is in the top 10. And how can West Bengal, with the fourth largest state GDP (and projected to be the second largest in 2020) be 18th in investment scenario? SAIBAL BAGCHI, on e-mailFloundering AroundThe BJP has been indulging in introspection and analysis of the reasons for its defeat in the Lok Sabha elections (“Still in a Stupor”, August 16). But so far it has only managed to replace “Hindutva” with “Bharatiyata” and “vikas”. SHIKHA KATARIA, PanchkulaThe BJP, the so-called party with a difference, is acting like a child whose lollipop has been snatched away. The Congress too is not behaving like a mature winner. Both parties seem to have forgotten that there are important issues to be dealt with. But instead of cooperating they are only trying to embarrass each other at every available opportunity. JOHN ERIC GOMES, Goa advertisementOne expected the BJP to act in a more responsible manner and Atal Bihari Vajpayee to provide the right guidance. But both have been big let-downs. MADHU SINGH, Ambala CantonmentPrice of HealthLow-cost blood glucose testing machines are indeed a must (“The Sweet Check”, August 9). But the fact is that the cost of the machine is only a part of the total cost of testing at home. The glucose testing strips are a major and recurrent cost. The testing device is of no use without these strips and diabetics would benefit only when the price of these strips come down. RAKSHIT TEWARI, AhmedabadSafety CatchDo our politicians and actors feel their lives are more precious than those of our soldiers or senior citizens who are soft targets for anti-social elements (“VIP Insecurity”, August 9)? People should not be forced to pay for the security of the privileged classes. S.L. BEDEKAR, BangaloreHit ParadeSalman Khan is the only actor who dares to be different (“Role Reversal”, August 2). When most other actors are doing only one or two films a year, Salman will have seven releases in a single year.With his hattrick of hits one can easily say that he is one of the most bankable stars in Bollywood. NITESH VYAS, on e-mailBasic ProblemThe Punjab Government is well within its rights to promulgate the legislation cancelling all its watersharing agreements (“Troubled Waters”, July 26). Punjab is an agrarian economy and it needs water to support the farming community. Contrary to popular belief, it relies heavily on groundwater to meet its agricultural requirements. But now even groundwater levels have dipped because of the indiscriminate installation of tubewells. SATISH SHARMA, DelhiCHARGE COUNTER CHARGEIt is difficult to believe Shujaat Hussain’s contention that Nawaz Sharif is lying because none of his pro-India statements would have endeared him to anyone in Pakistan (“Nawaz Sharif is Lying”, August 16). KESHAV AGARWAL, on e-mailBlame game seems to have become the national sport of Pakistan. The interview raises doubts about whom we should believe. SUBHAM PATHAK, BangaloreHussain’s statements on the Kargil war conceal rather than reveal what actually took place. H.R. BAPU SATYANARAYANA, Mysoreadvertisementlast_img read more

Australia Takes First Blood in the Mixed Open Division

first_imgNew Zealand was the first team to score before Australia hit back to lead at half-time and take a four touchdown win. Australia’s Nikki Etheridge impressed for the Australians, scoring four touchdowns. It took until the ninth minute of the match for either country to get on the scoreboard, and it was New Zealand who took the early advantage with Tiwi Davis scoring. The Australians were quick to hit back however, with Nikki Etheridge the recipient of a great long ball from Peter Watkins to score in the corner to level the game at 1-all. Michael Chapman scored his first touchdown for Australia just after the midway mark of the half, when a deflected pass landed in his hands to give them a 2-1 lead. Watkins again set up Etheridge for her second of the game and when Sarah Spacie scored in the corner in the 18th minute, Australia had a handy 3-1 lead. New Zealand hit back just before the siren to bring the deficit back to two touchdowns, with Clayton Ngawharau diving over but the Australians went to the half-time break up by two touchdowns, 4-2. Australia was quick to get back on the scoreboard in the second half, with co-captain Roy Prasad the recipient of a switch from Watkins, to take a 5-2 lead. Etheridge got her first touchdown of the second half in the third minute of the second when Sebe Rey darted from acting half to take a four touchdown lead. New Zealand’s Awhina Savage helped reduce the deficit to three touchdowns at the midway mark of the second half, scoring in the corner for her side to trail by just three, 6-3. Watkins was in the thick of the action two minutes later, with Spacie scoring her second to extend her side’s lead to four, and Etheridge made it a five touchdown lead with five minutes remaining with her fourth touchdown. New Zealand’s Lauren Ensor scored with minutes remaining, but it wasn’t enough to spark a Kiwi comeback, with the new look Australian team taking a four touchdown win, 8-4. Highlights of the game can be viewed at the TFA YouTube channel. Please click on the link to view the highlights:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WC8pLLb2Ys&list=UUNA2662hsW_18Wok5HHiMeg&index=1&feature=plcpAustralia – 8 (Nikki Etheridge 4, Sarah Spacie 2, Michael Chapman and Rohit Prasad) defeated New Zealand – 4 (Tiwi Davis, Lauren Ensor, Clayton Ngawharau and Awhina Savage)Half time: Australia 4 – New Zealand 2Referees – Mick Medlin, Andrew Williams and Anthony Smithlast_img read more

a month agoReal Madrid, Barcelona target Liverpool boss Klopp AND Van Dijk

first_imgReal Madrid, Barcelona target Liverpool boss Klopp AND Van Dijkby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp AND Virgil van Dijk are being linked with a LaLiga move.AS says the German’s success with the Reds has him being discussed inside the boardrooms of Real Madrid and Barcelona.With doubts persisting at Barca over coach Ernesto Valverde and inside Real regarding Zinedine Zidane’s return, it’s been suggested Klopp is emerging as the prime target for both clubs should choose to change.And it’s also claimed, with the LaLiga rivals keen on Van Dijk, their best shot at landing the Dutchman would be hiring Klopp as coach.For his part, Klopp has insisted he’s happy at Anfield and should the time come to part ways he would be taking a break from the game. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

UFC legend Georges StPierre drops by Sheshatshiu for a visit and some

first_imgAPTN National NewsStudents don’t usually go to school on the weekend.But the Sheshatshiu Innu First Nation in Labrador had a special visitor on Sunday.UFC legend Georges St-Pierre dropped by with some advice on bullying and showed the school wrestling team a few moves.APTN’s Ossie Michelin has the headlock on this story.last_img

Sujit Bose sets deadline to bring Bagri safety guidelines into effect

first_imgKolkata: The Minister of State (MoS) Fire with independent charge Sujit Bose on Wednesday visited the Bagri Market and reportedly assured the shopkeepers that Fire department would extend all cooperation to reopen the market shortly.He said some safety guidelines need to be followed by the market authorities and if the traders follows the Fire department suggestions they would shortly get the clearance to reopen their shops. According to sources, shop owners and members of Bagri Market Central Kolkata Traders’ Welfare Association had earlier requested the fire department to provide necessary clearance to reopen the shops in the market as the businessmen were facing huge losses. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaBose had asked the traders’ welfare association to submit an undertaking to the Fire department that the 11 points, which the department had suggested earlier will be followed accordingly. On Wednesday, Bose along with other fire officials went the Bagri Market to check its present situation. After inspecting the market premises, Bose asked the shop owners and traders’ welfare association authorities to implement those 11 points suggested by the department. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayInstallation of an underground reservoir with capacity of 50,000 litres, installation of smoke detectors-sprinklers, conversion of manual pumps to automatic, demolition of illegal part of the market and changing of diesel run transformer to dry transformer were some of the suggestions made by Sujit Bose during his visit to the market on Wednesday. Bose told the shop owners that if the association follows the Fire department guidelines then they would get the clearance within a week of submission of the undertaking. He provided seven days to the traders’ welfare association to submit the undertaking. A massive fire had broken out at the Bagri market a few months ago. About, 30 fire tenders were pressed into service. Ashutosh Singh, president of Bagri Market Central Kolkata Traders’ Welfare Association, said: “Businesspersons are happy with the suggestions made by Bose and his department as it is ray of hope for them. Singh said out of 11 points, four points have been taken care of and the problems have been sorted. He assured that the remaining seven points will be looked into soon and the orders from the Fire department will be followed accordingly. “We are grateful to the minister as responded positively to our demands. The suggestions made by him will definitely help us. The rectification process is on. We are doing it step-by-step. We have been granted seven days to submit the undertaking. Bose said after the submission of the undertaking, clearance will be given within seven days,” said Singh.last_img read more

166 FIRs and DD entry registered for violation of poll code

first_imgNEW DELHI: A total of 166 FIRs/DD entry have been lodged by the Delhi poll authorities for violation of model code of conduct, till date. Out of which, 20 are against AAP (12 FIRs and 8 DD entry), 22 against BJP (12 FIRs and 10 DD entry), 8 against Congress (3 FIRs and 5 DD entry), one FIR against BSP and one against SP (1 DD entry), two against CPI (M) (1 FIR and 01 DD entry) and 112 (108 FIRs and 4 DD Entry) are against under the head of others/non-political. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderSimilarly, till Thursday, a total of 3,12,048 hoardings/banners/posters have been removed in all over Delhi out of which 30,533 are removed from New Delhi Municipal Council, 43075 from East Delhi Municipal Corporation, 2411 from Delhi Cantonment Board, 130699 from South Delhi Municipal Corporation, and 105330 from North Delhi Municipal Corporation respectively. Meanwhile, so far, 1361 bottles, 91 half, 139589 quarters of Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) and 949 bottles, 1161 Half, 267806 quarters of Country liquor and 6797 bottles beer were seized.A total number of 934 FIRs have been registered in Excise Act and 931 persons are arrested in Excise Act. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsFurther according to the poll authority, 337 FIRs have been registered under Arms Act, in which 379 persons are arrested and 1338.3431 Kg. Narcotics/Drugs are seized respectively. Till date cash of Rs 2,82,22850/- has been seized by SST/FST, 448 numbers of unlicensed arms/weapons seized and 2630 numbers of cartridges/explosives/bombs seized. Whereas, 4582 licensed arms deposited, 72493 persons have been booked under various sections of CRPC/Delhi Police Act, as preventive action measures.last_img read more

Young baseball squad fights through early losses remains determined to win

First-year Ohio State baseball coach Greg Beals insists that the Buckeyes (1-2) not set specific goals as they progress through this season, though he will demand a “fighting mentality.”“We’re too young and too inexperienced to have these expectations of, ‘We should win all our games,’ or, ‘We should do this, this and that,’” Beals said. “We need to go out and establish ourselves as a baseball team before we start setting up what our goals are.”Beals has emphasized an approach that he says will help build a great team.“We have expectations about going through the process (of improving) the quality of our at-bat, the quality of our pitches,” Beals said.Redshirt senior right fielder Brian DeLucia has already bought into his new coach’s thinking.“For right now, our expectations aren’t very extensive in terms of where we want to be at the end of the season,” DeLucia said. “We’re gonna take it game by game.”With 19 underclassmen on its 33-player roster, OSU is a young team. DeLucia said the team’s youth is part of the reason for tempering predictions about wins and losses.“We’ve got a lot of young guys on this team,” DeLucia said. “We’ve got a lot of learning experiences, a lot of obstacles to overcome.”DeLucia also said his only personal expectation for the season was that he and his teammates would “fight like dogs.” Having already played their first three games, Beals’ players have proven to be resilient.While competing in the Big Ten/Big East Challenge in Florida on Friday and Saturday, OSU dropped its first two games, losing, 11-5, and, 2-0, to Cincinnati and No. 20 Louisville, respectively. The Buckeyes then eked out an 8-7 win on Saturday against No. 23 St. John’s in a game that lasted 11 innings.Beals pointed to Sunday’s win, his first as OSU’s coach, as evidence of the Buckeyes’ unwavering effort on the field.“It’s gonna take all of us, and a great example of that was the Sunday win,” Beals said. “We had to go deep into our bullpen. It took a lot of guys, and we ended up laying down a bunt to win a ball game.” In Beals’ eyes, the path to success is very simple.“Anyway, anyhow, anybody,” Beals said, “we gotta get that mentality to just fight and claw to get every success we can.”There is no set number of wins that the team is striving for, but redshirt junior right-handed pitcher Paul Geuy said the outlook is positive.“Expectations are quite high,” Geuy said. “It’s going to be a good year, definitely.” read more