Omar Archers case now a Human Rights matter

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#FredSmithandOmarArcher, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, April 13, 2017 – Nassau – Popular Human Rights activist and lawyer, Fred Smith, QC says that Mr. Omar Archer is now his client. This comes after Archer was yesterday remanded to jail yet again.  It is also being reported that Archer’s 28-day sentence has since been squashed. However, an instruction was given that he be remanded an additional seven days and his bail revoked.QC Smith told members of the media, “To keep Omar Archer in jail under an alleged offence of criminal libel is to make him a political prisoner.”  He added, “Criminal libel must be abolished so that the Bahamas can grow as a democracy.”Smith believes it is a Human Rights case now since offences like this “has sent an element of fear and anxiety and concern throughout the citizenry.” He believes people are now afraid to speak out against the government because they may be politically victimized like Archer and others.According to QC Smith, the Human Rights Association would also be taking international measures to ensure the international communities become aware of Archer’s case and the current laws in the Bahamas. He added, “This government in particular have been using these offences to prosecute people.”Archer’s team, however, believe it is uncommon for someone facing such minor matters to not be fined and freed. They found the judge’s ruling shocking and thinks that Archer is being treated like criminals who commit more serious crimes. Archer will now face the Supreme Court next Wednesday, and Smith revealed they are currently seeking his bail.Story by: Kay-Marie Fletcher#MagneticMediaNews#FredSmithandOmarArcherlast_img read more

Note 10 Plus specs vs iPhone XS Max OnePlus 7 Pro and

first_img iPhone XS Max Tags Water-resistant (IP68); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging; Face ID; Memoji No 12GB Note 10 Plus vs. iPhone XS Max, OnePlus 7 Pro and LG V50 specs £1,099 (64GB), £1,249 (256GB), £1,449 (512GB) All phones have their strengths and weaknesses, at least on paper. For instance, the Note 10 Plus has the biggest screen and battery, the iPhone XS Max has secure face scanning, the OnePlus 7 Pro is the least expensive of the bunch and the LG V50 has the sharpest display. To see how the devices stack up against one another, check out our chart, which compares each phone spec-by-spec. OnePlus 7 Pro Connector 256GB, 512GB No 6.5-inch Super Retina OLED; 2,688×1,242 pixels Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier 157.5×77.4×7.7 mm $669 (128GB/6GB); $699 (256GB/8GB); $749 (256GB/12GB) Apple A12 Bionic 458 ppi reading • Note 10 Plus specs vs. iPhone XS Max, OnePlus 7 Pro and LG V50 ThinQ Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10 Plus look incredible 498 ppi No Expandable storage 128GB, 256GB 2.84GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 See All 6.2×3.0x.3 in 6.26×3.0x0.33 in 6.67-inch AMOLED; 3,120×1,440 pixels 64GB, 256GB, 512GB 62 Photos Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 processor, or Samsung Exynos 9825 7.27 oz; 206g 162.6 x 75.9 x 8.8 mm Price off-contract (USD) Galaxy Note and Note 10 Plus are here to wow you 159.1×76.1x 8.3mm iOS 12 162.3×77.2×7.9 mm Storage $1,099 (64GB), $1,249 (256GB), $1,449 (512GB) Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus 6.4-inch OLED; 3,120×1,440 pixels Processor Price (GBP) 516 ppi Battery 6.39×3.04×0.31 in Price (AUD) Video capture Samsung Event 4K Lightning Post a comment 48-megapixel (standard), 8-megapixel (telephoto), 16-megapixel (ultra wide-angle) 2TB In-screen LG Samsung Apple OnePlus 10-megapixel Android 9.0 Pie Android 9.0 Pie Weight (Ounces, Grams) 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 16-megapixel (ultra wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto), 3D depth (HQVGA) Now playing: Watch this: 564 ppi 3,174-mAh (unconfirmed by Apple)center_img • 6GB, 8GB, 12GB 6.46 oz.; 183g 8-megapixel (standard), 5-megapixel (wide) In-screen AU$1,799 (64GB), AU$2,049 (256GB), AU$2,369 (512GB) Starts at £69 (EE) None (Face ID) Dimensions (Millimeters) Converted: AU$962 (128GB/6GB); AU$1,006 (256GB/8GB); AU$1,076 (256GB/12GB) Apple Starts at AU$1,728 4,000-mAh Fingerprint sensor 6.8-inch Dynamic AMOLED; 3,040×1,440 pixels Dimensions (Inches) Share your voice Back 12-megapixel (standard), 16-megapixel (wide-angle), 12-megapixel (telephoto) Wireless PowerShare; water resistant (IP68); S Pen stylus with Bluetooth connectivity and Air actions The Note 10 with the iPhone XS Max. Sarah Tew/CNET At a Brooklyn press event on Aug. 7, Samsung announced the Note 10, Note 10 Plus and Note 10 5G, three phones that have big screens, an embedded S Pen stylus and multiple rear cameras. Since the first Galaxy Note launch in 2011, the Note phones have stood out as part of Samsung’s ultraluxe line. The devices are usually outfitted with a steep price and top-of-the-line hardware, and represent the best of Samsung’s best.   But Samsung is not alone. With phone sales slumping globally, the crowded phone industry is more competitive than ever. Samsung’s main rival, Apple, has the iPhone XS Max, a phone with a brilliant 6.5-inch screen, a superfast processor and excellent dual rear cameras. On the Android side is the OnePlus 7 Pro, a cheaper phone that ultimately earned CNET’s Editors’ Choice award in June. Lastly, LG, which is based in South Korea along with Samsung, released the V50 ThinQ 5G. The V50 features a headphone jack, five cameras and next-gen 5G connectivity. USB-C USB-C Headphone jack Mobile software No USB-C Up to 1TB Special features LG V50 ThinQ 5G Android 9.0 Pie 90Hz display, pop-up selfie camera, dual-SIM, Warp Charging 5G connectivity; water resistant (IP68); wireless charging, Quick Charge 3.0 6.91 oz; 196g $1,099 128GB 4,300-mAh $1,000 (Verizon); $1,152 (Sprint) Octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demand 4K 7-megapixel Display size, resolution 0 RAM 4,000-mAh Mobile Phones 6GB 4K Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it 12-megapixel (standard), 12-megapixel (telephoto) TBD 16-megapixel Front-facing camera 7.3oz; 208g Not disclosed Yes 10:55 6.4×2.99×0.35 in Camera TBD No 4K Pixel density £649 (128GB/6GB); £699 (256GB/8GB); £799 (256GB/12GB)last_img read more

Trump rails at health care debacle

first_imgUS President Donald Trump speaks about the Senate health care bill during a lunch with members of the US military in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPAn angry President Donald Trump railed Tuesday against dissenters in his party who dashed his months-long effort to dismantle his predecessor’s landmark health care law, as moderates balked at the latest Republican plan to scrap Obamacare.With several efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) now squashed, the Senate’s top Republican said he would forge ahead with what could be a last-gasp vote—on a new plan to kill off most of the 2010 reforms of Trump’s predecessor without a replacement at the ready.Four Republicans had lined up against Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s earlier health overhaul, flatlining it in the chamber, where the party could afford only two defectors in order to get the measure passed.McConnell announced a fresh effort aimed at repealing Obamacare now and crafting a replacement later. But that too ran into opposition from at least three Republicans who refused to support repealing the law without a suitable fix at the ready.The Republican leader nonetheless prepared to force a vote to see where his members stood on the repeal-only measure.“That’s a vote I think we’re very likely to have in the very near future,” McConnell told reporters.No date was given, but number two Republican John Cornyn said he expected it this week.The dramatic implosion effectively means that Trump, who marks his first half-year in office Thursday, has no major legislative victory in hand, squandering months of political capital.Trump fired off a morning tweet storm complaining about how he was “let down” by Democrats “and a few Republicans” opposed to the repeal.He had campaigned relentlessly on a pledge to abolish most of the ACA, proclaiming at an October campaign rally that it would be “so easy” to immediately repeal and replace the law.But he has run into the uncompromising reality of American politics: even with a president’s party enjoying a majority in both chambers, crafting and passing landmark legislation can be perilous in the US Congress.The White House insisted that success remained within reach, with deputy spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders saying “we are not done with the health care battle.”But Trump said he was “disappointed,” and repeatedly offered that now it would be easier to just “let Obamacare fail.”He also stressed he wanted nothing to do with the blame for the collapse.“We’re not going to own it. I’m not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it,” he said.“We’ll let Obamacare fail and then the Democrats are going to come to us” looking to work on a solution.‘Time to start over’McConnell’s new bid would repeal much of Obamacare outright, but with a two-year delay of implementation, in order to allow Congress time to craft a replacement.A straight repeal bill passed Congress in 2015. That was during Obama’s presidency, and Republicans knew they would pay no political price for their votes, as Obama vetoed the measure.It is no longer a dress rehearsal, and some Republicans are clearly concerned they would be on the hook for any ensuing disruption to the health care system.Two years ago, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office warned that simply repealing Obamacare would essentially kick 18 million people off health care in the first year compared to current law, a figure that would balloon to 32 million by 2026.That is far worse than the 22 million that the CBO forecast would lose coverage under the latest repeal-and-replace legislation.With a number of Senate Republican moderates voicing concern about how the latest bill could adversely impact millions of people insured through Medicaid, the health coverage program for the poor and the disabled, McConnell’s bid floundered.“I cannot vote to repeal Obamacare without a replacement plan that addresses my concerns and the needs of West Virginians,” Senator Shelley Moore Capito said in a statement.Her state has significant numbers of residents on Medicaid.Another Republican opposed to the new plan, Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, acknowledged that McConnell had the nearly impossible task of coralling enough votes from his caucus’s rival conservative and moderate factions.“The majority leader is trying to keep all the frogs in the wheelbarrow, and it’s a tough job,” Murkowski said.While Democrats celebrated, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer extended an olive branch to his Republican rivals and encouraged them to work with Democrats to improve Obamacare.“It’s time to move on. It’s time to start over” on health care, he said.Meanwhile a bipartisan group of 11 governors urged the Senate to “immediately reject” the repeal-only effort and work with state executives on bettering the current system.“The best next step is for both parties to come together and do what we can all agree on: fix our unstable insurance markets,” said the governors, who included Ohio’s John Kasich, a 2016 Republican presidential hopeful, and Democrat Terry McAuliffe of Virginia.last_img read more

Bayou Project Moves Forward Though Some Still Dont Like It

first_img 00:00 /01:13 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Travis Bubenik/Houston Public MediaA view of Buffalo Bayou and the Houston skylineA Buffalo Bayou repair project is moving forward. This week, a permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was finalized for the six billion dollar plan, but some still think it’s a bad idea.Heated debates about the bayou aren’t exactly new. At a recent event honoring the late Houston conservation icon Terry Hershey, Mayor Sylvester Turner talked about her efforts to preserve the bayou’s green spaces decades ago.“Some people were coming in, wanting to put cement down, kinda straighten out the meanders and all of that,” he said. “Terry Hershey said no, that’s not going to happen, that’s not going to take place, and it didn’t happen.”Still, the debate over how to keep the bayou green isn’t over. The latest example is the Memorial Park Demonstration Project. It aims to fix increased erosion along a stretch of the Bayou that the local flood district says is caused by increased urbanization and other factors.They would need to do some careful re-channeling, which the district says would return this stretch to a more “natural state.” The Bayou Preservation Association supports the project, but another conservation group doesn’t.“Rivers erode,” says Susan Chadwick with Save Buffalo Bayou. “It’s part of the natural process.”The group says the project would destroy this part of the bayou and that it should be left alone. The Army Corps permit isn’t the project’s last step, and the debate’s likely to continue. The district says it could take about a year to finish when started. Listen X Sharelast_img read more

Pugh Wins Dem Mayoral Primary in Baltimore

first_imgCatherine Pugh, a three-term state senator who owns a public relations firm, celebrates Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Baltimore after winning the democratic nomination in Baltimore’s mayoral race. (AP Photo/Juliet Linderman)ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) —Catherine Pugh, a state senator and owner of a public relations firm, has won the Democratic primary for mayor of Baltimore.The 65-year-old lawmaker defeated 11 other candidates, including former Mayor Sheila Dixon. She is expected to win the general election in Baltimore, a Democratic stronghold.Pugh is a three-term state senator who also served on the Baltimore City Council for five years before she was appointed to the Maryland House of Delegates.She secured numerous endorsements in the months and weeks leading up to the primary. That included an endorsement from Councilman Nick Mosby, who waged an unsuccessful campaign for mayor that ended the day before early voting began April 14.last_img read more