Round 1: Vargas starts things off against Pacquiao

first_imgValdez stops Osawa in 7th round to retain WBO title 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Boxers Manny Pacquiao, Philippines, and Jessie Vargas, USA, pose together during their official weigh-in at the Wynn Las Vegas hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada on November 4, 2016.Pacquiao will challenge Vargas for the WBO Welterweight Title Saturday, November 5, 2016 at the Thomas & Mack Center. / AFP PHOTO / John GURZINSKIChampion Jessie Vargas was the first to assert his offense as the challenger Manny Pacquiao returns to boxing after he announced his retirement back in April.Vargas used his reach advantage over the shorter Pacquiao at Thomas & Mack Center to start things off in the fight for the WBO World welterweight championship.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND EDITORS’ PICK BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise PH among economies most vulnerable to virus FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports We are young Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View commentslast_img read more

F2 Logistics takes 3rd place, nips Generika

first_imgAra Galang defense keeps the ball for F2 as team mate Abbt marano, Kim Fajardo and Import Sydney Kemper looks over. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOF2 Logistics woke up from the wrong side of the bed but still ended up better than Generika, 25-17, 27-25, 25-19, 25-14, Thursday night in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix at FilOil Flying V Arena.F2 Logistics coach Ramil de Jesus said his wards were “too tired” because of the succession of games, but was grateful they eked out their sixth win in nine matches.ADVERTISEMENT As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH EDITORS’ PICK We are young Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND MOST READ The win allowed the Cargo Movers to take solo third place and within striking distance of outright semifinal slot.Hayley Spelman and Ara Galang accounted for 15 points each,w hile Sydney Kemper helped up with 13 markers for F2 Logistics.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThe Life Savers absorbed their 9th defeat in as many game despite double-digit outputs of Polina Liutikova, Darlene Ramdin and Shaya Adorador. Liutikova had 15, while Ramdinand Adorador made 11 and 10, respectively.The only winless club in the league managed to win a set and for a brief moment appeared to have a shot at the match. But Aby Marano and Spelma closed down the lanes with three blocks each to nip the rally in the bud. 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Tough battle ahead as UAAP Final Four begins Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes View commentslast_img read more

Ateneo, UST stake crown in UAAP Season 79 judo

first_imgUST, which defeated University of the East via a large margin last season, is tipped to win in the distaff side.In the juniors division, the Tiger Cubs, who dethroned the Blue Eaglets in the boys division last season, will enter the two-day event as heavy favorites.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentUST guns for a second straight title in the girls division, which is a demonstration event last year.The juniors’ matches will be held in the morning, while the seniors’ bouts will be played in the afternoon. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Alapag enjoying mentoring Meralco’s young guys as skills coach Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 MOST READ We are young 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Ateneo tries to defend the men’s crown while University of Santo Tomas seeks a three-peat in the women’s division as the UAAP judo championship opens Saturday at the Sports Pavilion inside De La Salle-Zobel campus in Ayala Alabang, Muntinlupa.The Blue Eagles are expected to face a stiff competition from the Growling Tigers, who ruled the event two years ago.ADVERTISEMENT Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND View comments EDITORS’ PICK As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportslast_img read more

Flashing lights ward off livestock-hunting pumas in northern Chile

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new paper reports that Foxlights, a brand of portable, intermittently flashing lights, kept pumas away from herds of alpacas and llamas during a recent calving season in northern Chile.Herds without the lights nearby lost seven animals during the four-month study period.The research used a “crossover” design, in which the herds without the lights at the beginning of the experiment had them installed halfway through, removing the possibility that the herds were protected by their locations and not the lights themselves. Pulsating lights placed around llama and alpaca herds warded off puma attacks during a recent experiment in Chile, suggesting the method might help avert conflict between herders and dwindling populations of the predator.“The implications are huge,” Omar Ohrens, a postdoctoral scholar in environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and lead author of a study on the findings, said in an interview.The landscape of the Andean Plateau in Chile, with the village of Chulluncane in the foreground. Image by Omar Ohrens.In the study by Ohrens and his colleagues published online Jan. 3 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, pumas left herds alone that had Foxlights set up close to the llamas and alpacas’ sleeping areas during a recent four-month calving season. During the same period, cats killed seven animals from herds that did not have the lights, which blink in a random pattern designed to mimic a person walking with a flashlight and other human activity.The puma (Puma concolor) is a critical part of the ecology of the high plains of the Andean Plateau, also called the Altiplano, of northern Chile. Such large predators regulate the number of herbivores on the landscape, keeping the entire ecosystem in balance.But when mountain lions pick off livestock, it threatens the livelihoods of the people who depend on that resource. In a 2016 study, Ohrens and his colleagues reported that pastoralists in this part of Chile estimate they lose 10 percent of their animals each year to pumas.A puma track spotted near the study site. Image by Omar Ohrens.The pumas, too, are at risk following these incidents, as herders look to eliminate the threat. But research has shown that killing a predator suspected of targeting livestock doesn’t always work, Ohrens said. What’s more, his earlier surveys of the Aymara llama and alpaca herders of the Altiplano revealed that most people didn’t want to kill pumas. That led Ohrens to find a way to identify and test a potential, non-lethal solution to this problem.In the planning stages of this study, he asked the herders themselves to choose from a variety of potential non-lethal deterrents, and they settled on Foxlights. Developed in Australia to keep young lambs safe from foxes, Foxlights also fit the grasslands of northern Chile. The wide-open plains of the Altiplano allow for the lights to be seen from as far away as 1.6 kilometers (1 mile), according to the manufacturer. And the sunlight that bathes the plateau, which sits between 3,000 and 5,500 meters (9,800 and 18,000 feet) above sea level, can recharge the lights’ batteries during the day.Researchers set up a camera trap near the study site. Image by Omar Ohrens.During the calving season in late 2016 and early 2017, Ohrens and his teammates compared the incidence of livestock kills in herds with lights installed nearby to deaths in herds without them.To make sure that they weren’t just witnessing a single puma zero in on herds without lights — an unlikely, but possible, situation given the large home ranges of pumas, the authors write — they set up camera traps around the herds of the 11 farmers who were part of the study. The images confirmed that at least three different cats were in the area.In a twist, Ohrens found that the lights did not spook off Andean foxes (Lycalopex culpaeus) going after young lambs. That didn’t come as a shock to Ohrens, who has worked in this part of his native Chile for seven years.Villablanca Lagoon and Sillajuay Mountain in the Andean Plateau. Image by Omar Ohrens.“What I’ve seen is that Andean foxes are not very scared of humans — they can get pretty close and even take food from people’s hands,” he said in a statement. “So they’re not going to be scared by lights that simulate human activity.”To further bolster the study’s rigor, the team also moved the lights partway through the experiment from the herds that had them at the beginning of the study to the ones that didn’t. They got similar results, demonstrating that the location of the herds didn’t determine whether the lights were effective.“That’s why this study is so important,” Adrian Treves, a co-author of the study and professor of environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin, said in the statement. “Omar’s study shows that non-lethal methods have been proven effective in multiple settings with different livestock and carnivores.”Banner image of study participants setting up a Foxlight next to a livestock sleeping site by Omar Ohrens. John Cannon is a Mongabay staff writer based in the Middle East. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonCorrection: An earlier version of this article misstated the study site location. It took place in northern, not southern, Chile.Ohrens, O., Bonacic, C., & Treves, A. (2019). Non-lethal defense of livestock against predators: flashing lights deter puma attacks in Chile. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.Ohrens, O., Treves, A., & Bonacic, C. (2016). Relationship between rural depopulation and puma-human conflict in the high Andes of Chile. Environmental Conservation, 43(1), 24-33.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animal Behavior, Animals, Big Cats, Camera Trapping, Carnivores, Cats, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Ecology, Environment, Grasslands, Human-wildlife Conflict, Hunting, Indigenous Peoples, Livestock, low-tech, Mammals, Mountains, Predators, Research, Technology, Top Predators, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildtech center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

Primates lose ground to surging commodity production in their habitats

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored “Forest risk” commodities, such as beef, palm oil, and fossil fuels, led to a significant proportion of the 1.8 million square kilometers (695,000 square miles) of forest that was cleared between 2001 and 2017 — an area almost the size of Mexico.A previous study found that 60 percent of primates face extinction and 75 percent of species’ numbers are declining.The authors say that addressing the loss of primate habitat due to the production of commodities is possible, though it will require a global effort to “green” the international trade in these commodities. The global trade of products that come at the expense of tropical forest is driving many primate species closer to extinction, a new study suggests.The research, published June 17 in the journal PeerJ, found that the production or extraction of these “forest risk” commodities, such as beef, palm oil, and fossil fuels, led to a significant proportion of the 1.8 million square kilometers (695,000 square miles) of forest that was cleared between 2001 and 2017 — an area almost the size of Mexico.“The consequences of [harvesting] these resources is that they result in the permanent deforestation and conversion of forested habitats into monocultures, pastures, degraded and polluted habitats,” Paul Garber, one of the paper’s co-authors and a primatologist at the University of Illinois, said in a video abstract. “If we look at the 15 primate-richest countries in the world, by the end of this century, if we don’t change business as usual, 80 to 100 percent of the primate species in those countries will be threatened with extinction or be extinct.”A Bornean orangutan in Malaysia. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.In a previous study, Garber and his colleagues found that 60 percent of primate species worldwide are threatened with extinction and that 75 percent of species’ numbers are declining. For this research, the team compared those figures with surges in trade in regions where primates live and data on forest loss.“There’s been an increase of about 300 percent across all of these four areas in commodities trade over the last 15 years,” Garber said. But, he added, the commodities driving the loss of forests, as well as the impacts that growing or extracting them had, vary from region to region.In Southeast Asia, for example, the production of commodities like palm oil and rubber led to nearly half of all deforestation. In Mexico and Central and South America, soy and beef were responsible for about a quarter of forest loss.Photos of selected primate species impacted by forest loss and degradation resulting from the production of forest-risk commodities. Image © 2019 Estrada et al. From top left, Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygameus), Borneo, by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay; western gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), Gabon, by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay; Indochinese lutung (Trachypithecus germaini), Cambodia, by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay; white-headed langur (Trachypithecus poliocephalus), China, by P. A. Garber; black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), Madagascar, by S. Johnson; and black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra), Mexico, by S. Van Belle.South Asia had a similar amount of its deforestation — 26 percent — as a result of the push for commodities, though in that part of the world, fossil fuels and gemstone mining played the most significant roles. In Africa, 7 percent of deforestation occurred due to tradeable commodities, mainly the extraction of minerals and fossil fuels.Nearly all of the demand for these goods came from just 10 countries, Garber said. Among the top importers of these goods are the United States, China, Japan and Switzerland; the U.S. and China were the destinations for 58 percent of these forest-risk exports.Garber called primates the “canary in the coal mine,” and the authors say the places where these primates live need to be protected for their sakes as well as our own.A chimpanzee in Uganda. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.“Primates and their habitats are a vital component of the world’s natural heritage and culture,” Alejandro Estrada, the study’s first author and a primatologist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, said in a statement. “[A]s our closest living biological relatives, nonhuman primates deserve our full attention, concern, and support for their conservation and survivorship.”Garber added, “It comes at a great cost to the environment and people living in these primate habitat countries who are still relatively poor, food insecure, they have income inequality, and there’s still political instability in these countries.”The authors say the international community needs to come together through a set of international agreements to overhaul how these products — which end up in supermarkets, gas stations and shops in consumer countries — are harvested, arguing that we must trade “green.”Image © 2019 Estrada et al.“What we mean by that is that the cost of a product needs to include the environmental cost of production,” Garber said, “and then those funds need to [be] put into an international fund that can be used to try to mitigate some of the problems.”Without such global action, the team writes, more species will continue to fall under the specter of the threat of extinction or be wiped out entirely.“We have a window of time to change our behavior, but that requires leadership and a set of people worldwide who can help direct this effort,” Garber said. “It cannot be done by any one country. It’s not the fault of any one country. But we need international agreements to move this forward.”Banner image of a ring-tailed lemur by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Citations:Estrada, A., Garber, P. A., & Chaudhary, A. (2019). Expanding global commodities trade and consumption place the world’s primates at risk of extinction. PeerJ, 7, e7068. doi:10.7717/peerj.7068Estrada, A., Garber, P. A., Rylands, A. B., Roos, C., Fernandez-Duque, E., Di Fiore, A., … & Rovero, F. (2017). Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter. Science advances, 3(1), e1600946. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1600946FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Activism, Agriculture, Amphibians, Animal Behavior, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Borneo Orangutan, Bushmeat, Cats, Chimpanzees, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Politics, Extinction, Fish, Fishing, Forests, Fragmentation, Frogs, Gorillas, Green, Herps, Impact Of Climate Change, In-situ Conservation, Insects, Invasive Species, Invertebrates, Iucn, Mammals, Natural Capital, New Species, Orangutans, Parks, Poaching, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Reptiles, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more