People with mental health problems are becoming t

first_imgPeople with mental health problems are becoming “tangled up” in the bureaucracy and flaws of the government’s new universal credit benefit system, a committee of MPs have heard.Members of the public accounts committee heard this week that claimants were facing “considerable hardship and considerable deterioration in their mental health” because of universal credit.Sophie Corlett, director of external relations for the mental health charity Mind, told them: “They struggle with the process, but they end up tangled in the process and unable to dig their way out of it.“They struggle with the online application, they struggle with the conditionality that comes while you wait for your work capability assessment (WCA), they struggle with waiting for their first payment and if they are able to get an advance payment they struggle to pay that back.”She also highlighted concerns about the role of the government’s work coaches, who are based at jobcentres and have “discretion” about whether they make adjustments to the process, including whether to relax the conditions placed on disabled claimants.A key concern, said Corlett, was the period between the start of a universal credit claim and the WCA, during which claimants can be forced to carry out the usual 30-plus hours of jobsearch activity while waiting to be assessed for their “fitness for work”.Carrying out this jobsearch activity was “a huge barrier” for many people with mental health problems, who were often not even well enough to visit their jobcentre.She said work coaches were often not using their discretion in such cases, which meant claimants ended up being sanctioned.Under the sanctions system, benefit recipients have part of their payments temporarily stopped if they fail to meet strict work-related conditions, such as failing to attend a work placement, or being a few minutes late for a jobcentre appointment.Corlett said that many claimants with mental health problems were struggling with the online “journal” that universal claimants must keep updated, because of fears that they will be “caught out” by one of the requirements that keep “popping up”.She told the committee: “People talk to us about the fear of something popping up on that that they might miss and that they need to be eternally vigilant and constantly looking at it.”Corlett, whose evidence was based on reports from the charity’s 130 local groups across the country, said the “bureaucratic entanglement” of universal credit meant people with mental health problems “struggle financially” and their “trust in the system and their trust in the work coach is really undermined and it has a massive impact on people’s mental health”.Emma Revie, chief executive of The Trussell Trust, which runs a national network of 400 foodbanks, told the committee that disabled people were among the groups “over-represented” among users of foodbanks.She said that foodbanks in the areas where universal credit had been fully rolled out for at least a year had experienced an average increase of 52 per cent in the number of people using the services in the 12 months after the full rollout began.But those in areas that were either not subjected to the universal credit “full service”, or had been subject to the full rollout for less than three months, had shown an average increase of just 13 per cent in users over the same period.Revie warned that the universal credit caseload would at least “quadruple” when DWP began introducing “managed migration”, when claimants on existing benefits whose circumstances have not changed in the meantime – including a large number of disabled people on employment and support allowance – are moved over to universal credit.Managed migration is expected to begin next summer.Revie said: “At the moment we are not managing to target and provide the right support to the right people, to prevent them facing having no food.“We need to try and fix this before we get to managed migration where it might be too difficult to pull it back.”Alison Greenhill, director of finance for Leicester City Council, said her local authority was already dealing with two eviction notices from landlords, just three weeks after “full service” began in the city.She said: “It was a shock to me how private landlords were nervous about the impact of universal credit, particularly on the delay in rent payments.”Tony Kirkham, director of resources for Newcastle City Council – which has been coping with universal credit full service for about 18 months – said: “Landlords are basically saying they will not accept people on universal credit.”He said the level of rent arrears among people with a rent account with the council who were now on universal credit had more than doubled from £1 million to £2.1 million since its introduction.And he said his council was dealing with people on universal credit who were being left with just £12 a week to feed themselves.In a separate evidence session, DWP’s permanent secretary, Peter Schofield, told the committee that he did not know why the number of people using foodbanks was increasing in areas with “full service” universal credit but he said it was a “very complex situation”.He added: “I would much rather that we were in a situation where people did not need to go to food banks.”He said he had talked to a “very good food bank in Hastings”, which had a good relationship with the local jobcentre.Schofield said: “As far as I know, at no point has the food bank said to the jobcentre that there are issues with universal credit that are causing an increase in take-up at the food bank.” A note from the editor:For nine years, Disability News Service has survived largely through the support of a small number of disability organisations – most of them user-led – that have subscribed to its weekly supply of news stories. That support has been incredibly valuable but is no longer enough to keep DNS financially viable. For this reason, please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support its work and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please remember that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring, and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

Community

first_imgThe Anti Racism campaign looks to show children the effects of racism within schools and most importantly, how we can stop it.We want to get the message out to local children that every child is different in their own ways and should not be judged, whether that’s for speaking another language or via their skin colour. Everybody deserves equality.SCDF are looking to implement the Anti Racism campaign in local schools around the borough starting in September and we hope that giving an insight into racism and how to tackle it can be a great starting point into getting racism out of our schools.We had a fantastic pilot this week at Wargrave Primary School where we delivered our very first Anti Racism workshop to year three, four and five children.SCDF received fantastic feedback from both the children and teachers and hope to deliver this fantastic initiative across local schools in our communities.If your school is interested in getting involved, please email: SCDF@saintsrlfc.com.last_img read more

Wilmington Police investigating shooting

first_img Holt then tried to drive himself to the hospital when an officer pulled him over for careless and reckless driving. When police saw Holt’s condition, EMS came and took Holt to New Hanover Regional Medical Center.No word on and suspect or Holt’s current condition. WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Wilmington Police are investigating an early morning shooting.Police say Myron Holt was at his car on Metting Road around 5:30 a.m. when he received multiple, non-life threatening gunshot wounds.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Whiteville city leaders strut past any decisions on animal control laws

first_img00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Whiteville city leaders will not move forward, right now, with revisions to the city animal control laws.During their meeting Tuesday night, the city decided to review the ordinance changes and vote on them at a later time.- Advertisement – Some of the changes would prevent the commercial sale of eggs or meat from animals like chickens in city limits.They also would prohibit homeowners from raising turkeys or guineas in the city.However, the changes would allow for small Vietnamese potbellied pigs in homes or on leashes.last_img read more

Community works to restore AfricanAmerican cemetery

first_img The group has been raising money to repair and restore the cemetery. Walker says there are about 1,500 people buried at the site, but there are less than 300 hundred markers.“And so it was a recognition that something really needed to be done to, one – make the area safe for people, but also be able to identify if there was any location for new burials to occur,” said Walker.But most importantly, Walker wants to preserve the history behind the cemetery and those who are buried there.Related Article: Southport marks Memorial Day with parade, cemetery event“I’ve always been somebody who believes black history of communities, if it’s told at all, isn’t told told correctly,” said Walker.Walker says the cemetery contains the graves of major public figures in Southport, so he wants the community to know about their city’s history. Walker is joined by a diverse group of people in Southport who have been dedicated to this project.“I realized ‘Oh my goodness, I live a block and a half away from there. I’ve been driving by it everyday and had no idea the significance of that,’” Ellie DeYoung said.DeYoung joined the group about a year after Walker. She has helped the group raise about $20,000 so far and they hope to double that amount.Not only do they want to beautify the cemetery, but they also want to create a better understanding of the African-American contribution to the city through the years.“The community, once it’s known about the black cemetery, has really rallied in a way that has been really supportive of our efforts,” said Walker.With all hands on deck, Walker and DeYoung hope to change the way people see the city’s history. 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings SOUTHPORT, N.C. (WWAY) — One group in Southport is working to restore and repair a African-American cemetery that has been around for centuries.“My view of it is that it takes a community to save a cemetery,” said Gordon Walker, who has been working with the John N. Smith Restoration and Preservation Inc. for four years.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Its just devastation Some areas remain accessible only by boat

first_imgASH, NC (WWAY) — Record flood levels still impacting parts of Brunswick County, a week after Hurricane Florence hit our region.WWAY’s Andrew James joined the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office as they monitored the flooded roads and homes Thursday.- Advertisement – For days, flooding in Ash has led to dozens of rescues.“It’s just amazing the amount of water, I’ve never seen anything like this,” BCSO Chief Deputy Charlie Miller said.The only way WWAY and deputies were able to accessed parts of Kingtown Road was through an armored vehicle.Related Article: Boiling Spring Lakes: Only 40% of recovery completed since historic hurricaneIn northern Ash, farms, roads, cars, and homes are flooded.“They’ve lost pretty much everything they have,” Miller said. “With some of these houses, their vehicles and food and clothing and it’s just devastation.”It’s devastation that left hundreds stranded in need of Chief Deputy Miller and his rescue team.For the most part, if you live in parts of northwestern Brunswick County the only way you can get across the county line is by air boat.“One day you would travel it and you would not see anything,” Miller said. “The next day you’d come back and travel that same route and you’d start seeing the tops of vehicles.”The news is improving for this part of the county.“We’re hoping that it will start dropping soon, which it has dropped in this area a little bit overnight, but we still have some areas that are rising some.”The Waccamaw River has crested. According to the National Weather Service, it did Thursday night at more than 22 feet, 3 feet above Matthew levels, but slowly it should begin to go down.last_img read more

Police DNA leads to ID of duo wanted in vending machine breakins

first_imgWHITEVILLE, NC (WWAY) — A husband and wife are wanted for allegedly breaking into numerous vending machines in Whiteville, causing several thousand dollars worth of damage.Whiteville Police says investigative work and DNA evidence helped the department identify the pair.- Advertisement – From June 2018 through January, police say William Ling and his wife Angela’s crime spree netted them cash from vending machines at Auto Tracks Car Wash, Gurganus Feed and Seed, Go Gas, Hills Supermarket, and Meritt’s Sporting Goods.WWAY reported on this vending machine thefts in an episode of UNSOLVED back in August.Whiteville Police Spokesman Alan May says Detective Ron Guyton was able to get a DNA sample from a machine vandalized by the Lings. That sample, along with video surveillance video, led them to obtain 32 warrants.Related Article: Trump’s ex-lawyer admits lies about Russian real estate dealThe Lings are charged with breaking and entering of a coin operated machine, larceny from a coin operated machine, and damage to property.Alan May says the duo have similar warrants in Brunswick County.They are believed to be in South Carolina.If you know any information, you are asked to call Whiteville PD at (910) 642-5111.last_img read more

ONLY ON 3 Sheriff Jody Greene already making changes in office

first_img In just his three weeks in office, Sheriff Jody Greene is trying to change the whole culture of the Columbus County Sheriff’s Office.“We’re on a positive note,” Greene said. “There’s going to be no negativity here. We’re here to put the heartbeat back.”After months of legal wrangling Greene is the new sheriff in town, and he’s ready to work.Related Article: Duo busted in Columbus Co. after chase across state lines“I want us to regain the respect this office deserves,” he said. “If people, especially the ones that didn’t support me or were not behind me, just take a look and see if you see any changes.”With less than a month under his belt, Greene is already making changes. He says with eight new hires just on Monday, the sheriff’s office is up to around 90%staffing for the first time in years.“Finally back up just about to full staff,” he said. “Along with that, going back to where we have lack of equipment, it’s hard to even get cars together for these folks to use to work with. Like I said, we’ve got to have the tools or we’re dead in the water. There’s nothing we can do.”With the help of a federal grant, Greene says they have already gotten high-water trucks, generators and other equipment to use during hurricanes, something he says they were completely without.Plus, he says they are getting brand new computers and patrol cars.“We’re bringing the Columbus County Sheriff’s Office into the 21st century,” he said.Greene also introduced the Heavy Enforcement Action Team to help build his deputies’ presence in the community.As for his critics, Greene has said the same thing all along.“This is where I was born and raised,” he said. “This is where I live. This is where I’m going to die. Columbus County.”Greene says he’s just getting started, but he cannot do it alone.“It’s not I,” he said. “It’s not Jody Greene. It’s the Columbus County Sheriff’s Office.”Greene says he wants Columbus County to be a place that everybody can be proud of. 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings COLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — He has been at the helm not even a month, but Jody Greene says he is wasting no time leading the Columbus County Sheriff’s Office.Greene officially became Sheriff in June after a seven-month long debate about who the rightful sheriff was.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Henley Partners Moldovan passport scheme suspended

first_img <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> SharePrint The Moldova Citizenship-by-Investment (MCBI) program, developed in partnership with its service provider Henley & Partners, has been temporarily suspended due to “questions about the companies that are involved in this program”. Henley & Partners also manages Malta’s Citizenship by Investment Programme.According to Investment Migration Insider (IMI), President Igor Dodon has expressed his concern on the program following a meeting with Moldova’s Supreme Security Council. IMI quotes Dodon as saying: “There are questions about the companies that are involved in this program. Until we clear these up, we’re suspending the program”.Read: Henley & Partners will now sell Moldovan passportsHenley & Partners had won a public tender to design, implement and promote Moldova Citizenship-by-Investment (MCBI) Program in July of 2018. Gantenbein from Henley & Partners had said that Moldova offers its citizens visa-free access to 121 countries which include as well all the countries in the Schengen Area as well as Russia and Turkey.Henley & Partners was contracted by the Government of Malta to sell Maltese citizenship back in 2014.Read: ‘Investor citizenship creates risks for member states and the Union’ – ECThe European Commission had stated that  “investor citizenship and residence schemes create a range of risks for member states and for the union as a whole,” according to the Financial Times. It had said that the programmes of some EU states to sell passports and visas to wealthy foreigners could help organised crime groups infiltrate the bloc and raise the risk of money laundering, corruption and tax evasion.Read: EU warns of crime risks from governments’ sales of passports, visasAlthough legal, these schemes are sometimes run in opaque ways and without sufficient checks on those who acquire passports and visas, the Commission had said, mostly raising concerns about the programmes in Malta and Cyprus.Read more:Henley and Partners’ profits rise by 500%, selling passportsMaltese citizenship programme ranked top by Henley & PartnersMalta down to 9th place on Henley and Partners Passport IndexWhatsApplast_img read more

Dimension Data accelerates Namibias ICT development

first_imgAdvertisement The Telecom Namibia ICT Summit 2011 not only focuses on cutting-edge technologies, but will also provide a platform for ICT technology vendors, service providers and the public sector to share ideas, and discuss the challenges and opportunities of a linked global village.Tony Munro, Solutions Executive at Dimension Data Emerging Africa, presented a keynote on the first day of the event.“As the leading ICT service provider in Africa, the Dimension Data Namibia team looks forward to meeting and engaging with clients to discuss relevant ICT issues,” he says. – Advertisement – Innovation and investment in the telecommunications sector are key enablers for Namibia’s economic transformation to a stronger and more productive, knowledge-based economy. Dimension Data is best placed to support government in its mandate to enable the strategic use of ICT to help create social and economic changes in health, education and culture, and also increase civic engagement around the world.Dimension Data Namibia was established in 2006 and has participated in the ICT Summit since its inception. The company has close to 60 members of staff in Namibia manning two offices in Windhoek and Walvis Bay.Dimension Data continues to grow and has become a trusted ICT service provider in Namibia. The company stands ready to assist clients respond to the unique challenges faced in Africa.“Over the past few years, we have been building cloud-related skills and capabilities in the areas of virtualisation, data centre and storage, managed services and hosting, as well as IT outsourcing – all critical components to enabling cloud architectures for our clients. The recent acquisition of OpSource will provide Dimension Data with a significantly enhanced value proposition for clients,” says Munro.Source: itnewsafricalast_img read more

Mozillas FirefoxOS Smartphone to cost only 25

first_imgAdvertisement The smartphone price barrier has been broken by Mozilla after it unveiled a $25 (£15) device prototype aimed at the developing world.The smartphone is created in partnership with Chinese low-cost chip maker Spreadtrum, will be able to run simple apps and make use of mobile internet.It would appeal to the type of people who currently buy cheap ‘feature’ phones who are locked into long contracts to subsidise the cost of smartphones, analysts said. – Advertisement – The prototype could allow Mozilla to have an early lead in a market that is increasingly being targeted by mobile device manufacturers.Jay Sullivan, Mozilla’s chief operating officer, told MWC that Mozilla plans to add 12 markets in Asia, Latin America and Africa this year to the 15 markets it entered by the end of last year. Individual partners are expected to release the dates of availability for each market.‘We are about bringing people online,’ Mr Sullivan said during the introduction.At last year’s MWC, 18 wireless carriers supported the development of an open mobile operating system by Mozilla to build out a range of cheaper smartphones. In addition to the $25 (£15) smartphone, Mozilla also launched several high-end models, including devices from Huawei and ZTE.Source: Daily Maillast_img read more

Samsung launches Smart School in Senegal

first_imgAdvertisement The Senegal Ministry of Education and Samsung Electronics Africa have today announced the launch of a mobile education solution aimed at creating positive change and providing an advanced and interactive classroom experience for learners.Installed at the Plan Jaxaay Secondary School, the Samsung Smart School initiative is an integrated platform that includes a monitoring and controlling feature – which allows teachers to keep track of educational content on their learners’ screens – a screen-sharing feature and a real-time question-and-answer feature.The future of education is about accessing information and collaborating locally and globally. Teaching and learning has become social; this has become possible with the emergence of initiatives such as the Samsung Smart School,” says Samba Guisse, IT Advisor, Human Resources Department  at the Ministry of National Education in Senegal. – Advertisement – Samsung’s Corporate Citizenship arm has always supported the development of education with the view of impacting society and the economy. Samsung believes that access to technology can create new learning possibilities for students, paving their way towards lifelong learning and personal development in order to acquire the knowledge and skills needed in today’s society.Launched in the country in partnership with Millennium Connect Africa, Samsung’s Smart Schools are part of the company’s far-reaching African citizenship programme, designed to positively impact the lives of Africans.Smart Schools have also been installed in countries like Mali, South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, DR Congo and Sudan.last_img read more

The Best Productivity Tools for Small Businesses

first_imgNow it’s time to take a look at the best productivity apps out there and they will make your life easier and help you get things done. Image Credit: FitsMallBusiness Advertisement Running a small business is hard work, but also very rewarding, especially if you use the proper tools to ensure your day is as productive as possible. Today’s small business owners have access to a wide range of free and paid productivity tools to help them communicate, delegate, and generally keep on top of day-to-day activities with ease.The Pomodoro TechniqueOften, managing your time wisely is one of the hardest parts of running a small business. The Pomodoro Technique, which many entrepreneurs swear by, helps people manage their time and eliminate burnout by creating balance. Traditionally, Pomodoro has you work for 25 minutes, take a five-minute break, and so on, but part of the beauty of this method is the ability to change your intervals based on what works best for your needs. You can experiment with different intervals until you find the one that makes you the most productive.EvernoteIf you’re one of those people who has 15 different to-do lists stuck to your desk, you probably need a more cohesive way to track them. Evernote helps you do that. Available as both a desktop application and a mobile app, it keeps track of your to-do lists, stores photos of business receipts, saves audio clips, PDFs, and website links, records your voice notes, and much more, and will sync between your devices. You can use the basic option, or if you work with a team or want offline access, you can choose a plus, premium, or business option.DocuSign – Advertisement – Running your own business leaves you little time to track down vendors or other business partners to sign paperwork. Luckily, there is a digital option. DocuSign allows you to create contracts and other necessary paperwork, email it to the proper recipients, and have them provide a digital signature. The documents, which you can use for sales contracts, tax forms, and a variety of other purposes, are legally binding around the world.All Things GoogleGoogle has really worked to provide ample tools for small businesses in recent years, with Google Docs, Google Drive, and Google Spreadsheets leading the pack. These tools make it more than easy to share secure documents and spreadsheets with team members, business partners, and customers, all over a secure cloud. You can even make and share notes or have conversations within the document, which saves the entire team time during the workday.MailChimpAny good business will have a solid email newsletter or marketing campaign. MailChimp helps you do just that by offering a simple interface that lets you design and send the perfect newsletters and sales campaigns for your business. More than 9 million people already use MailChimp, which also provides automated options, easy-to-understand analytics, and integration with many other apps.PDF2XLIf you’ve ever received a large PDF of information that needed to be in spreadsheet format, you know how tedious the task of manual conversion can be. PDF2XL gets rid of the problem by automatically converting up to 500 pages of PDF documents per minute for you. Available in more than 130 languages and in a wide range of file types, you can use PDF2XL to convert PDF to Excel on several platforms.Windows XPWindows VistaWindows 7Windows 8Windows 10+Even better, since the conversion is automatic, you won’t have to worry about problems related to human errors that occur during manual conversion.StayFocusdAvailable as a Google Chrome extension, StayFocusd blocks all those pesky websites like Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Instead of letting them suck the time out of your day, you can set up StayFocusd in a number of ways. You can choose to allow yourself only a certain amount of time on the websites per day, block them during certain times of the day, or “go nuclear” and block them for hours or even days at a time. You can even set it up so that you have to complete a difficult challenge before you can change any of your settings, making it that much harder to “cheat” the system.Of course, these tools are just a few of the dozens available. For a truly productive business day, you will need to find the tools that best fit your needs and the needs of your company.last_img read more

Interview ALAN POTTS

first_imgSimon Nott from Star Sports catches up with ALAN POTTS who is a punter that has stood the test of time. He’s punted on a professional level for decades and written books on the subject. His first ‘Against The Crowd’ has been mentioned as influential by several present-day professionals. Alan didn’t go too much on the idea of winning millions and spending the lot but rather that he’d like to be known as the punter that won half a million and kept it!MEETING ALAN POTTS: PART 1 BET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321Simon Nott is author of Skint Mob!: Tales from the Betting RingCLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS MEETING ALAN POTTS: PART 3center_img MEETING ALAN POTTS: PART 2last_img read more

BENS BLOG 1992 13 Hove Dogs

first_img“Will you drop me off at The Dogs later, Mum?”. 4pm. I’ve read The Racing Post, The Sporting Life, (Dogs Sections only), and walked later to get The Evening Argus, for Pat Kelly’s column.5.30pm. “Mum, will you bring me to The Dogs in an hour?” (My jacket already on).Now time to lift the tempo. It’s getting urgent.“Mum, if we don’t leave for the track soon, I’ll miss the first” (I’ve got one lined up in the opening A12 (yes, they had A12s then)).Arrive at track. Dropped off on the corner, next to the supermarket.Must now get past security-man and possibly even blag in for free with an Owner (EVERY PUNTER’S LIFE-MISSION).The first turnstile on the left is the softer-touch. Let’s try there first.Yes. In. But had to pay the 2 quid. Fucker.First stop – Norman’s betting-shop. I’ve got a tenner to collect; that’s my ammo for the night.Done. Necessary.The kennels are on the left. “Dry & Devious” is there, as usual, chain-smoking, with some other kennel-hands. They’ve all got ambitions to go it alone. Who’ll make it happen though? The smell of the dogs on them, engrained more than the fags; testament to their ambition.Dogs are trialling. George Curtis is watching. As the hare starts spinning, he glances at me and nods. That’s a good gee-up and start to proceedings anyway, Blog.Do a right. Walk straight past all the foreign-students, who are always milling about in the amateur area of the terraces. Let’s get to the action.Bo Brown, on the left, last pitch on. A tough pitch for the boy from Southampton. The outsider of the local Bookies. But with his brothers; blonde and silent Guy, and cocky Matt; they make a firm. Lacking the Hove Guile, but clearly good workers.Charlie Miller. His own man. Wasn’t going to change for anyone. (And never did or will). Ready to ruck.John Poulter. Established. Knowing and respected. Fat Roger tic-taccing and in awe of him (but learning all the time and waiting his turn). Always a steely aura around this firm.To my right though, there’s a little team counting some readdies. What are they up to? I think they’re in with one of the new trainers. What’s been waiting all week, Blog? Maybe, later on, we’ll tail ’em for a bit, shall we?Moving on: Brian Clarkson. A patient Bookie, the game happening around him. Play coming to him. Then, Del Sears. Nice guy. Grafter. Has a bit of a go. Works with the wife (the Punters like her).Dave Peile. Flair and charisma. Pulling the prices. A sheen and opinion that connects with The Punters. A money taker. The other Bookies, always with helpful little comments about him.I fancy the 4 dog. He’s a bit screwy but quicker than these. 5/2 painted. Hang on, Blog. Hang on, a sec. Charlie Miller’s gone 3 it. Where’s Morris, the old boy? “Morris, Morris, put 3 quid on the 4 dog with Charlie for me.”.Bet on. Bubbles, his kind bag-man, gives me the nod. And Morris returns the ticket to me and my pocket, which contains the other 7 quid of gun-powder.Ian Rice, the sp man. Immaculate. And with eyes darting everywhere around the Bookie’s boards. Loves a conspiracy.To my right now, on the terrace above the winning-line, there’s the guy who makes notes on the Seasons of all Bitches. Pages and pages of it. He’s intense and shouts “You gotta know your Bitches!”, when he backs a winner. I never know what to make of him.They’re all out tonight. Trophy night. Owners in suits, or jackets at the least. That bit more cut in the air. Maybe they might get on the podium with their dog and trainer, and to have a little touch in the ring too? Well, that would be just perfect. That would make the weekend.A community. In action, all around me. With the united goal of somehow getting ahead. Somehow, finding THAT little edge. But respecting each other and what they each had to do. THE SCHOOL OF LIFE.In other news:Ben’s Food Vlog 53, Hove Greyhound Stadium, Neville Road, BN3 7BZ. WEB SITE Fantastic viewing (of the racing and and an eagle-eye over those Bookie Chaps). A good value dinner. Tangy tomato Soup (NB). Christmas Pud (NAP). A slightly biased 8Over and out, B xlast_img read more

EXCLUSIVE Davy Russell Alastair Down Tigers Ready To Roll

first_imgSTAR SPORTS EXCLUSIVE: Our brand ambassador DAVY RUSSELL discusses all things TIGER ROLL with ALASTAIR DOWN from the Racing Post. Tiger Roll bids to become the first horse since Red Rum to win back to back Grand Nationals on Saturday and he’s a warm favourite to do so. Davy recalls how his association with the equine legend began – and of course the magical memories from 12 months ago.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>last_img read more

Joe Hickerson to perform and lecture at Rice

first_imgShareCONTACT: B.J. Almond PHONE: (713) 348-6770 E-MAIL: balmond@rice.edu CO-WRITER OF ‘WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE?’ WILL PERFORM AND LECTURE AT RICE MARCH 28-29 Joe Hickerson’s performances are free and open to public ”Where have all the flowers gone?” asked one of the earliest protest songs of the ’60s. One of the folk singers who co-wrote that anthem – Joe Hickerson — will perform that song and other tunes at 8 p.m. March 28 during a free concert at Willy’s Pub in the basement of Rice Memorial Center at Rice University.   Hickerson, a folk guitarist and Library of Congress music archivist, will also give two talks related to folk music March 29 in the Kyle Morrow Room on the third floor of Rice’s Fondren Library. At 11 a.m. he will discuss intellectual property, copyright and sound archives; at 2 p.m. he will present a lecture titled ”O Brother, Where Have All the Song Catchers Gone?” All events are free and open to the public. While working as a camp counselor in the early ’60s, Hickerson wrote the fourth and fifth verses of ”Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” when folk songwriter/singer Pete Seeger shared the song with him.   In addition to Seeger, artists who have recorded the song include Peter, Paul and Mary, Marlene Dietrich, Olivia Newton-John, Joan Baez and the Kingston Trio, whose version had the highest chart success – No. 21 – in 1962. Hickerson now performs in coffeehouses and folk clubs as well as on college campuses and radio programs, including a Prairie Home Companion.   He is a former head of the Archives of Folk Songs at the Library of Congress and a founding member of the Folklore Society of Greater Washington. The repertoire of this music scholar ranges from labor songs and children’s songs to parodies, Irish-American songs and sea songs. # # # AddThislast_img read more

Rice ties in race for atomicscale breakthrough

first_imgShareCONTACT: Mike WilliamsPHONE: 713-348-6728E-MAIL: mikewilliams@rice.eduRice ties in race for atomic-scale breakthroughKillian lab creates Bose-Einstein condensate from strontiumEverybody loves a race to the wire, even when the result is a tie. The great irony is the ultraprecise clocks that could result from this competition could probably break any tie.The Rice lab of physicist Tom Killian published a paper online this month demonstrating the long-sought creation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of strontium atoms. BEC is a state of matter predicted by early 20th century physicist Satyendra Nath Bose and Albert Einstein. Basically, at extremely cold temperatures, some types of atoms come to almost a complete standstill and enter a state in which they lose their individual identity.In the same online edition of Physical Review Letters, a paper by the laboratory of Rudolf Grimm at the Universität Innsbruck in Austria reported the same result.Though it was a scramble to the finish line, in the end a gentlemanly agreement determined the knotty outcome. Killian said he caught wind of the Austrians’ work in an online archive where physicists commonly post pre-prints of upcoming papers.“We’ve both been working on this for a long time, but when their paper appeared on the archive, there was still a technical problem keeping us from getting a BEC,” said Killian, an associate professor of physics and astronomy. “After three or four all-nighters, we fixed our problem, wrote the paper and submitted it. At that point I discovered the Austrian paper had been fast-tracked and publication was imminent.”Killian got on the phone with the journal’s editor. “He called Austria, and they said they’d be happy to wait for us. They were very generous.”Killian said his lab had been working towards a BEC for years, avoiding trial-and-error in favor of measurements to determine which isotope of strontium was most likely to condense. Killian’s collaborators on the new study are primary author Natatli Martinez de Escobar, Pascal Mickelson, Mi Yan and Brian DeSalvo, all Rice graduate students, and former graduate student Sarah Nagel, now a physics instructor at YES Prep in Houston. Nagel remains associated with the Rice lab through a “Research Experience for Teachers” program funded by the National Science Foundation.To get the atoms to stop in their tracks and form a BEC, the lab had to cool them to near absolute zero Kelvin (−459.67 degrees Fahrenheit) through a combination of tried-and-true techniques involving lasers and evaporative cooling. That brings the trapped atoms, which are inside an evacuated chamber, to within a millionth of a degree of zero Kelvin. At that point, the atoms collapse into a condensate – a singular lump that physicists can play with.A good explanation of BECs and the cooling technique appears at www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/bec/what_is_it.html, courtesy of the University of Colorado at Boulder.Physicists have been making BECs since 1995, when Eric Cornell, Carl Wieman, and Wolfgang Ketterle confirmed Bose and Einstein’s theory with ultracold atoms and won the Nobel Prize for their efforts. Randy Hulet of the Rice Physics and Astronomy department has also made seminal contributions to the field from its beginning. A number of elements have since been used to make BECs, most of them alkali metal atoms, which have one valence electron. The number of valence electrons, which spin in the outer shell of an atom, determines how it reacts with other atoms.Strontium has two valence electrons, which really changes the game. “In the lowest energy state they spin in opposite directions and pair up very nicely,” said Killian. Applying just the right amount of energy via a laser can flip the spin of one of the electrons. Once they’re aligned, in the case of strontium, they stay that way for minutes.“That long-lived, excited state allows you to lock your laser to just the right energy for spin flipping,” he said. “This controls the frequency of the laser, or the rate at which the waves go by. Those waves become the pendulum of the world’s most accurate clock.” Killian expects the combination of clock technology and BECs can lead to breakthroughs in quantum computing. In 2004, a BEC in ytterbium, another two-valence-electron atom, was observed, but strontium is used in the best clocks, and strontium BECs contain 10 times more atoms, which is important for future experiments.Killian expects the Austrian lab will pursue quantum computation, but his interests lie elsewhere. “It turns out that, for the same reasons these atoms make a good clock, we can use lasers to manipulate the way the atoms interact with each other.“Lasers can change interactions on small length scales and very quickly, which opens the study of fundamental phenomena in solid-state physics and materials we don’t quite understand,” he said.Killian said manipulating interactions could also lead, someday, to matter-wave “lasers” for very precise sensors. “That has applications for things like navigating airplanes or submarines, detecting oil deposits underground, or tunnels where tunnels shouldn’t be, like along international borders,” he said.“I do really fundamental physics, but if we work on these techniques, 10-15 years from now they could have applications,” Killian said. “The specific properties of strontium make it very useful for some of these applications, which is why it’s valuable.” AddThis,Everybody loves a race to the wire, even when the result is a tie. The great irony is the ultraprecise clocks that could result from this competition could probably break any tie.The Rice lab of physicist Tom Killian published a paper online this month demonstrating the long-sought creation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of strontium atoms. BEC is a state of matter predicted by early 20th century physicist Satyendra Nath Bose and Albert Einstein. Basically, at extremely cold temperatures, some types of atoms come to almost a complete standstill and enter a state in which they lose their individual identity.In the same online edition of Physical Review Letters, a paper by the laboratory of Rudolf Grimm at the Universität Innsbruck in Austria reported the same result.Though it was a scramble to the finish line, in the end a gentlemanly agreement determined the knotty outcome. Killian said he caught wind of the Austrians’ work in an online archive where physicists commonly post pre-prints of upcoming papers.“We’ve both been working on this for a long time, but when their paper appeared on the archive, there was still a technical problem keeping us from getting a BEC,” said Killian, an associate professor of physics and astronomy. “After three or four all-nighters, we fixed our problem, wrote the paper and submitted it. At that point I discovered the Austrian paper had been fast-tracked and publication was imminent.”Killian got on the phone with the journal’s editor. “He called Austria, and they said they’d be happy to wait for us. They were very generous.”Killian said his lab had been working towards a BEC for years, avoiding trial-and-error in favor of measurements to determine which isotope of strontium was most likely to condense. Killian’s collaborators on the new study are primary author Natatli Martinez de Escobar, Pascal Mickelson, Mi Yan and Brian DeSalvo, all Rice graduate students, and former graduate student Sarah Nagel, now a physics instructor at YES Prep in Houston. Nagel remains associated with the Rice lab through a “Research Experience for Teachers” program funded by the National Science Foundation.To get the atoms to stop in their tracks and form a BEC, the lab had to cool them to near absolute zero Kelvin (−459.67 degrees Fahrenheit) through a combination of tried-and-true techniques involving lasers and evaporative cooling. That brings the trapped atoms, which are inside an evacuated chamber, to within a millionth of a degree of zero Kelvin. At that point, the atoms collapse into a condensate – a singular lump that physicists can play with.A good explanation of BECs and the cooling technique appears at www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/bec/what_is_it.html, courtesy of the University of Colorado at Boulder.Physicists have been making BECs since 1995, when Eric Cornell, Carl Wieman, and Wolfgang Ketterle confirmed Bose and Einstein’s theory with ultracold atoms and won the Nobel Prize for their efforts. Randy Hulet of the Rice Physics and Astronomy department has also made seminal contributions to the field from its beginning. A number of elements have since been used to make BECs, most of them alkali metal atoms, which have one valence electron. The number of valence electrons, which spin in the outer shell of an atom, determines how it reacts with other atoms.Strontium has two valence electrons, which really changes the game. “In the lowest energy state they spin in opposite directions and pair up very nicely,” said Killian. Applying just the right amount of energy via a laser can flip the spin of one of the electrons. Once they’re aligned, in the case of strontium, they stay that way for minutes.“That long-lived, excited state allows you to lock your laser to just the right energy for spin flipping,” he said. “This controls the frequency of the laser, or the rate at which the waves go by. Those waves become the pendulum of the world’s most accurate clock.” Killian expects the combination of clock technology and BECs can lead to breakthroughs in quantum computing. In 2004, a BEC in ytterbium, another two-valence-electron atom, was observed, but strontium is used in the best clocks, and strontium BECs contain 10 times more atoms, which is important for future experiments.Killian expects the Austrian lab will pursue quantum computation, but his interests lie elsewhere. “It turns out that, for the same reasons these atoms make a good clock, we can use lasers to manipulate the way the atoms interact with each other.“Lasers can change interactions on small length scales and very quickly, which opens the study of fundamental phenomena in solid-state physics and materials we don’t quite understand,” he said.Killian said manipulating interactions could also lead, someday, to matter-wave “lasers” for very precise sensors. “That has applications for things like navigating airplanes or submarines, detecting oil deposits underground, or tunnels where tunnels shouldn’t be, like along international borders,” he said.“I do really fundamental physics, but if we work on these techniques, 10-15 years from now they could have applications,” Killian said. “The specific properties of strontium make it very useful for some of these applications, which is why it’s valuable.”last_img read more

The impact of gentrification on health is topic at Rices Baker Institute

first_imgShareMEDIA ADVISORYDavid Ruthdavid@rice.edu713-348-6327Jeff Falkjfalk@rice.edu713-348-6775The impact of gentrification on health is topic at Rice’s Baker Institute Sept. 29HOUSTON – (Sept. 28, 2017) – Four leading national experts will take part in a panel exploring the impact of gentrification on health at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy Sept. 29.Hosted by the Baker Institute’s Center for Health and Biosciences and Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, the event is free and open to the public but registration is required.Who: Panelists Vickie Boothe, senior evaluator, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Lance Freeman, editor, City and Community, and professor, Urban Planning Program, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University; Ruby Mendenhall, associate professor of sociology, African-American studies, regional and national urban planning, gender and women’s studies, and social work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Tram Nguyen, local policy coordinator, Place Matters, Alameda County Public Health Department, California.Quianta Moore, the Baker Institute’s fellow in child health policy, will serve as moderator.What: An event titled “Exploring the Impact of Gentrification on Health.”When: Friday, Sept. 29, 8:30-10:30 a.m. (Breakfast will be served at 8.)Where: Rice University, Baker Hall, Doré Commons, 6100 Main St.As urban neighborhoods in Houston and beyond undergo rapid change, gentrification and its impact on residents have become hot-button issues, according to event organizers. Public health researchers grapple with how to define gentrification and how to examine its impact on health apart from the effects of increased neighborhood investments. Meanwhile, policymakers and advocates struggle to protect residents’ well-being while still allowing their neighborhoods to grow and flourish, organizers said.The public must RSVP for the event at www.bakerinstitute.org/events/1886. A live webcast will be available at the event page.Members of the news media who want to attend should RSVP to Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at jfalk@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.For a map of Rice University’s campus with parking information, go to www.rice.edu/maps. Media are advised to park in the Central Campus Garage.-30-Follow the Baker Institute via Twitter @BakerInstitute.Follow the Baker Institute’s Center for Health and Biosciences via Twitter @BakerCHB.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Founded in 1993, Rice University’s Baker Institute ranks among the top five university-affiliated think tanks in the world. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows, Rice University faculty scholars and staff, coupled with its outreach to the Rice student body through fellow-taught classes — including a public policy course — and student leadership and internship programs. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog. FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

Charles Olson Presented With Smith School CIBER Award

first_img regions: Baltimore / Washington, DC About the AuthorMax PulciniMax Pulcini is a Philadelphia-based writer and reporter. He has an affinity for Philly sports teams, Super Smash Bros. and cured meats and cheeses. Max has written for Philadelphia-based publications such as Spirit News, Philadelphia City Paper, and Billy Penn, as well as national news outlets like The Daily Beast.View more posts by Max Pulcini Charles Olson Presented With Smith School CIBER Award The Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business has awarded Charles E. Olson, a professor in the logistics, business and public policy department, with the CIBER Award for Teaching Innovation in Global Learning.The mission of CIBER is to promote U.S. capacity for international understanding and economic enterprise and the ability of U.S. business to prosper in an international economy. CIBER Awards are presented to Smith faculty members who demonstrate “a commitment to teaching for a global mindset, meaning openness to and awareness of diversity across cultures and markets.” This is the second year that the award has been presented. Olson is a nationally recognized expert on the cost of capital to public utilities. He is also a recognized expert on all aspects of public utility regulation and energy economics. Olson has testified in several hundred utility cases in 50 jurisdictions and has consulted for more than 100 utilities as well as industrial companies, state agencies, trade associations and environmental groups.Olson’s current focus is on teaching managerial and macro economics to first-year MBA course on the global economic environment as well as the undergraduate honors seminar. He also participates in several executive programs. He also leads the MBA Global Business Course to Europe. Additionally, Olson is involved in course and program development and does case related research.Olson initially expanded his global outlook in 1969 when he traveled to Colombia to advise providers on electricity rates. While his first global experience was long ago, Olson believes it’s never too late to expand your business horizons.“For faculty who have not developed a global mindset, it is never too late to start,” Olson said. “Most of my global involvement began after I returned to Smith in 2000. Language is not a barrier. Go fearlessly and embrace it. The impact on your quality of life will be amazing.”center_img Last Updated May 23, 2017 by Max PulciniFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail RelatedAwards Season at Robert H. Smith School of BusinessToward the end of each academic year, the Robert H. Smith School of Business honors top MBA students and business school faculty by presenting an array of awards. These awards celebrate various accomplishments, achievements, acknowledgments, and milestones to students and faculty alike.Full-time MBA students at the annual MBA End-of-Year Banquet…May 24, 2016In “Featured Region”Export Workshops Coming to Smith School Through MayAccording to the Smith School, the Industry Professional Workshop Series in Export Management will start January 12, 2017, at the University of Maryland BioPark in Baltimore.December 13, 2016In “Featured Region”Howard Team Wins at Maryland Emerging Market Case CompetitionLast month, nine teams from eight top MBA programs came together at the Robert H. Smith School of Business for the third Annual Emerging Market Case Competition, sponsored by Infosys Consulting & IT Services. According to a press release, teams were tasked with providing recommendations to an Infosys ATM financial…March 7, 2017In “Featured Region”last_img read more