Live from Altiris ManageFusion in Orlando

first_imgWhat break-out sessions and materials were available at the event? (“Realizing the value of Intel vPro” – focus on how to integrate Intel vPro into a production environment. A hands-on lab also occurred to step through common operational usage models.) Keynote demonstration – showing how the Intel vPro client can be remediated (or isolated) to only the management console on specific ports. Using the Altiris TaskServer – a 1:many job was defined to place a system in remediation, restart a process on the client, and remove the system from remediation. This did require a customization to the network filter settings (e.g. System Defense). The value of isolating a system on the computers NIC was very compelling and led to many conversations. At the demo booth – some of the most frequent questions (and associated answers) include: When will Intel vPro and Centrino Pro be available? (Product available today from all major OEMs – including Dell’s recent product announcement for Latitude 630c) Will Intel vPro appear in other platforms beyond PC-based laptops and desktops? (No publicly stated plans. Raise the question\interest with your preferred OEM) The conference goes through end of the week – yet the excitement around Intel vPro will continue for days\months to come. Below is a quick summary of items shown. Have questions or want more information? Add a comment or post a question. Are customers adopting Intel vPro? (Yes) Does Intel vPro utilize Wake-on-LAN? (The remote power features are communicated via TCP\IP for reliability\consistency. WoL utilizes UDP and a “magic packet” to contact systems – yet may not act as reliably. In addition, Intel vPro remote power features allow for power off. With integration into Altiris – the ability to record present power state, perform list of defined tasks, and to return the system to the previously recorded power state.) How do channel partners and service providers get training or more information to assist their customers? (Utilize sites such Intel vPro Expert, Altiris Juice, and so forth today. Formalized training material and events are being created. Stay tuned) How long has Intel vPro been available? (Product has been available for a year now) There were likely other questions – yet these questions occurred frequently.With the event closing this Thursday – some early discussions already starting to build on the momentum…. “What should we show next time?”. I’m thinking more real-world scenarios, enterprise reference architecture for implementation, and remote configuration – what do you think?last_img read more

Using Instrumentation To Drive Data Center Efficiency – Intel’s ACE In The Hole

first_imgTo learn more about ACE at the upcoming Intel Developer Conference in San Francisco, check out the “ECOS003 Advanced Cooling Environment (ACE) Technology: Controlling Data Center Cooling with Servers” or stop by the ACE demo in the Eco-Tech Zone of the Tech Showcase. Earlier this year Intel, HP, IBM, Lawrence Berkeley Labs, Emerson Network Power & Wunderlich-Malec collaborated on a California Energy Commissions sponsored MacGuyver-ish project call Advanced Cooling Environment (ACE) to solve an issue that many data centers face – overcooling their data centers beyond the needs of the servers and other IT equipment running inside of the facility.  You see, IT equipment is designed to run within a temperature envelope. If the air coming into the server is warmer than the envelope, you run the risk of overheating. If the air coming into the server is colder than the envelope, you are spending too much money on cooling the air, which does nothing other than needlessly increase the cost of operating the data center and reduces the energy efficiency as well. The team surveyed the items at its disposal and determined that they could link data from the front panel temperature sensors (server instrumentation) on the servers to the control systems of the computer room air handlers (CRAHs – essentially air conditioners) via standard data center management communication protocol.   The CRAHs could then dynamically adjust the speed of the fans and the temperature of the air to the requirements of the servers. The results: servers received the appropriate temperature air, power costs for cooling went down and the energy efficiency of the data center went up.  Problem solved….and they didn’t even use a paper clip or shoestring.  The real beauty of the project is that all of the items used are commercially available today for you to instrument your data center and improve the energy efficiency of your operation.center_img Have you ever had one of those MacGuyver moments? You know – you have a problem to solve and a collection of items at your disposal, and if you use can figure out how to use those items, you can save the day.last_img read more

Newsletter Published: Intel vPro Technology Heartbeat

first_imgThis week’s newsletter highlights success stories by Intel IT, BMW, Valerent, Compucom, and Computacenter. In addition, find our latest webinar offerings, known issues, and quick links to useful documents on the Intel vPro Expert Center.Click here to view the newsletter.Want to receive this bi-weekly newsletter in your inbox? Click here to subscribe.last_img

Intel® Xeon® Processor 5600 Series Helps INFN Put Italy on the Cutting Edge of Scientific Computing

first_imgDownload NowThe Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) operates an organization in Bologna known as CNAF–the National Center for Research and Development in Information and Data-Transmission Technologies. CNAF is responsible for managing and developing the most important information and data transmission services to support INFN’s high-energy physics research at a national level. Its research activities are divided into five scientific categories: accelerator physics, astroparticle physics, nuclear physics, theoretical physics, and technological development.INFN CNAF has implemented a new on-demand grid/cloud framework for scientific computing based on open, standard technologies and powered by the Intel® Xeon® processor 5600 series. This is one of the world’s first proven, OS-based implementations to achieve excellent scalability and flexibility in providing shared access to resources and integration between grids and clouds–without the need to partition resource pools.“Our data centers support thousands of users and tens of diverse communities,” explained Davide Salomoni, computing research director for INFN CNAF. “Through efficient use of virtualization technologies, we have been able to expand our offerings and to integrate grid and cloud services.”For details, download our new INFN CNAF business success story. As always, you can find this one, and many others, on the Intel.com Business Success Stories for IT Managers page.last_img read more

Never mind the Smart Home, here’s the Smart Office

first_imgIs it just me, or does the printer run out of paper, or ink, every time you need a document in a rush – usually a couple of seconds before a meeting or important conference call? Good, I didn’t think it was just me.In the UK we refer to this phenomenon as Sod’s Law or, more commonly, Murphy’s Law or, as I like to call it, the Infuriating Office Peripheral’s Law.I wonder how many hours a year are lost in this way in offices up and down the country: how much time it takes to discover the document you sent to print isn’t coming through, let alone the time it takes to search for the paper to refill the printer. I’m guessing hundreds, if not thousands, of hours wasted.But it needn’t be that way. Thanks to the Internet of Things (IoT), our offices are set to become a whole lot smarter.Internet of Things in the officeThe number of Internet-connected devices is growing at an exponential rate. Gartner predicts that there will be 4.9 billion connected things in use in 2015Opens in a new window, up 30 percent from 2014, with this figure rising to 25 billion by 2020.We’re already pretty used to people talking about the Smart Home: smart fridges, TVs and thermostats, and many of us will already have these devices in our home. Internet-connected vehicles and wearables like smart watches are also finding their way into our lives. Less-often discussed, however, is the power of the IoT to transform the office environment, yet the potential is huge.Facilities management service provider CoorOpens in a new window is just one of the companies leading this charge.Streamlining facilities managementWhen you arrive at the office you expect everything you need during your working day to be functioning properly, whether it’s the projector in the meeting room or the towel dispenser in the washroom. If it’s not, it can create inconvenience and delays, which means disruption and lost productivity.This is where facilities management comes in. However, for companies like Coor to keep on top of every printer, copier, paper towel dispenser and vending machine, they would need to dedicate someone to checking every device, numerous times a day – an unsustainable solution.The IoT offers a more convenient alternative.Accelerating the smarter officeTogether with Swedish IoT specialist YanziOpens in a new window, Coor developed an easy-to-use IoT solution powered by Intel® technology. Read the case study here.Opens in a new windowCustomers are able to attach Yanzi sensors to whatever device it is they want to monitor, out of the box with no complicated set-up. Yanzi gateways, powered by the Intel® Atom™ processor, are equipped with TeliaSoneraOpens in a new window SIM cards to connect the device to the Yanzi cloud which runs on the Intel® Xeon® processor E5 family. Facilities managers are able to see the data collected by the sensors through an app, either iOS or Android-based, enabling them to keep an eye on all office devices in real time on a single dashboard.Improving efficiencyMaking even a small change can result in huge efficiency gains. For example, say in a meeting, the projector bulb is faulty, resulting in about half an hour spent getting it fixed before the presentation can continue. If there are ten people in that meeting, that’s actually five working hours wasted. By ensuring facilities managers are aware of the fault in the equipment first, the Coor IoT solution helps avoid situations like this and ensure those five hours get put to better use.Coor has also demonstrated how the solution can help improve overall business efficiency. Sensors placed on desks can track how often they are used and identify any areas that are underutilised. With the cost of office real estate rising across Europe, the advantages of this are obvious.Already the Smart Office is about way more than placating printer rage. And, in the future, it will be about even more. Coor, Yanzi and Intel are now in discussions with hand dryer manufacturers, vending machine producers and office machinery companies to explore opportunities to further extend the use of the IoT solution.Read more on Intel and the IoTOpens in a new windowFind out more about the Coor IoT solutionOpens in a new windowGet in touch@sheppardiOpens in a new windowlast_img read more

Better Engineering Empowered by the Cloud

first_imgServant, Dunbrack, McKenzie & MacDonald Limited (SDMM) provides innovative, sustainable design through surveying and engineering consultations. Traditional surveying methods take three to five days just to capture the topography of a site, and often require working with out-of-date photos and limited 2-D maps.These traditional methods have become too expensive and time consuming for both consultants and their clients to maintain, spurring innovation across the industry. There have been rapid advancements in many surveying and engineering tech tools in just a few years, and SDMM has become a leader in the industry by making ongoing investments in technology to innovate its service offering.“These are heavy data sets, and the workstations we use for data and content creation need to be powerful,” explains Chris Foran, vice president of innovation at SDMM. The company needed a whole suite of powerful, collaborative hardware, both in the field and in the office, that could handle extremely high-resolution photos and 3-D maps flawlessly. The right tools for the jobSDMM upgraded their technology and now controls their unmanned aerial vehicle with a tablet powered by an Intel Atom processor. The raw data is processed either on site by SDMM or by Autodesk on its cloud service hosted by Intel cloud partner Amazon Cloud Services. The team is now armed with Pix4D desktop software running on a high-end workstation equipped with Intel Xeon processor E5 technology and mobile solutions featuring the Intel Core i7 processor family. With this new approach, Foran estimates it takes 30 percent less time than traditional surveying, but provides millions more data points. It would take a person a lifetime to collect the same information collected by a laser scanner in just two hours.“These are disruptive technologies. They have a ‘wow factor’ and deliver things customers didn’t know were possible,” adds David Males, director of sales and marketing. Once customers see how the technology can be applied, they realize it can not only save them money, but also allows them to make faster decisions.“Our whole experience has been with Intel-based platforms, which tells us the hardware works and is solid,” says Males.Better, safer in every wayBecause much of the work in the field is done on uneven and dangerous ground, SDMM’s upgrade is about more than wowing customers — it’s about keeping employees safe. Using laser scanning technology, SDMM can now scan 360 degrees, while mapping millions of points of data and creating an image of those data points called a point cloud.“This technology allows us to do things we never could have dreamed of doing before,” says Foran. “We get a high level of complete data safer because we don’t have to access the dangerous areas of the site. As long as we can see it, we can get the information we need.”Now that they’ve made the upgrade, SDMM’s customers are thrilled with the results and realize they’ll never again have to put up with outdated or incomplete data. SDMM can now confidently give their customers immersive 3-D representations of the land. Learn more about SDMM’s new technology and how the right hardware upgrades could boost your small business. Have you upgraded recently? Comment below, and tell us what’s helped your small business compete! And join us on Twitter!last_img read more

At ISC, Intel® Technologies Unleash the Intertwined Future of AI and HPC

first_img15:0015:2015:40PANEL: HPC in ManufacturingIT Transformation for Industrial CompetitivenessMarie-Christine Sawley,IntelGerd Buttner, AirbusWim Slagter, ANSYS®TBD, GridcoreRolf Fischer, Intes, 19:45The Power of Neptune: How to Increase Performance & Reduce Energy ConsumptionVinod Kamath, Patrick Moakley and Lidia Wojdat,Lenovo 19:15Hybrid HPCJean-Luc Assor, Lori IngleHPE 11:0011:2011:40PANEL: Intel Select Solutions – Intro to Professional VisualizationJim Jeffers,IntelDan Stanzione , TACC, TX Luis Paulo Santos, Univ of Porto, Portugal Francesco Ruffino, Amazon  Michael Migliore, Kitware  Ullrich Becker-Lemgau and Werner Krotz-Vogel, Intel 17:00What’s new with Intel® Omni-Path ArchitectureSusan Bobholz, Intel TIMETopicHost/Speakers Guest 13:003D Convolutional GANs for fast detector simulationSofia Vallecorsa, Federico Carminati, and Gulrukh Khattak, CERN 17:0017:2017:40HPC in the CloudUser Panel: How do Users Consume Cloud Services? Customer Experiences in Consuming HPC Solutions from the Cloud. What Sets the Players Apart?  Does it Support Hybrid?  What about GDPR?Ullrich Becker-Lemgau,IntelAndrew Cusick, DXCTony Spagnuolo, RescaleGisli Kr. , AdvaniaMark Parsons, EPCC, University of EdinburghKarlheinz Pischke, Microsoft Azure 10:2010:4011:00PANEL: HPC Workloads/Apps  – Skylake & OPAAswathy Nair, IntelWim Slagter, ANSYS®Keith Foston, SiemensPiush Patel, AltairSameer Shende, University of Oregon 17:00Accelerating modern physics simulations with FPGAsTobias Kenter and Christian Plessl, Paderborn University 13:20Advances Made in ANSYS Fluent® on Intel® Omni-Path Architecture and Latest Intel® ProcessorsWim Slagter,  ANSYS® 14:0014:2014:40PANEL: HPC in the Cloud – Hybrid HPC, What Works What Not, Cloud HPC Providers Sharing their ViewsBill Magro,IntelJon Thor Kristinsson, AdvaniaDave Hanlon,HPC SA DXCGabriel Broner, RescaleGeoff Newell, Appsbroker  Hugo Meiland, Microsoft 18:0018:2018:40KEYNOTE: Supercomputing: Redefined  (in Panorama 2) Dr. Raj Hazra, Corporate Vice President at Intel 13:40The Exascale Deep Learning and Simulation Enabled Precision Medicine for Cancer ProjectThomas Brettin, Rick Stevens, and Fangfang Xia, Argonne National Lab 12:0012:2012:40PANEL:Innovative NVM Solutions for HPC Storage and MemoryAndrey Kudryavtsev,IntelSven Oehme, Spectrum Scale ResearchZivan Ori, Dualport NVMe Storage, E8 StorageDr. Alexander Moskovsky, General Manager, RSC TechnologiesVladimir Mironov, Senior Researcher, Lomonosov Moscow State University TIMETopicHost/Speakers Guest 14:40EXHIBIT HALL OPENS 15:00 16:00Intel® Xeon® Scalable Processor FamilyVladimir Kostarev, Intel 16:20Harness the Power of Supercomputing in the CloudGirish Bhatia and Stacey Mccallum, Cray 09:40EXHIBIT HALL OPENS 10:00 a.m. 17:20Application performance and scaling on OPAJeffrey Salmond, University of Cambridge 13:40Application OptimizationCase analysis of large-scaled on Xeon + OmniPath HPCJerry Liu, Inspur 15:00Intel Optane and NVM solutions for HPCAndrey Kudryavtsev, Intel MONDAY, June 25th 15:20Towards a modular supercomputer architecture for HPC and Data AnalyticsNorbert Eicker, Morris Riedel, and Hans-Christian Hoppe, Juelich Supercomputing Center and Intel 14:20Swarm64 S64DA – Accelerate high-performance data processing and analyticsJuri Schmidt,Swarm64 AS 10:00Fast and Accurate Training of an AI Radiologist on Intel Xeon-based Dell EMC SupercomputersLucas Wilson, Alex Filby, Nishanth Dandapanthula, Onur Celebioglu, Valeriu Codreanu and Damian Podareanu,Dell/EMC, SURFsara 11:40Intuitive Visual Performance Modeling & Tuning – Using Roofline Analysis for Performance TuningZakhar Matveev and Mike Lee,Intel 17:20OpenHPC Deep Dive: What’s New in PBS Pro v18Piush Patel and Bill Nitzberg, Altaircenter_img 15:0015:2015:40PANEL: Women in HPC: Diversity ChallengesSusan Bobholz,IntelToni Collis, Women in HPC Carolyn Coke Reed Devany, Data VortexMarie-Christine Sawley, Intel 12:0012:2012:40PANEL: Convergence of AI and HPCBinay Ackalloor,IntelProf. David Keyes, KAUSTVikram Saletore, IntelValeriu Codreanu, SURFsara B.V.Gaurav Kaul, AmazonSofia Vallecorsa, CERN 14:40HPC for industrial applications on Intel® platformsR. Fischer, M. Ast, H. Manz,INTES – Ingenieurgesellschaft für technische Software GmbHand M. Klemm, Intel 19:30MEGWARE HPC Clusters, an Energy Efficient Intel® Select Solution for Simulation and ModelingAxel Auweter,MEGWARE Computer Vertrieb und Service GmbH 19:00Building a Balanced Artificial Intelligence SystemPamela Sufi,Penguin Computing 16:40Hyper-converged and ultra-compact RSC Tornado solution for HPC, datacenter and cloudAlexey Shmelev, RSC Group 17:40Designing efficient big memory systems in HPCAndrey Kudryavtsev, Intel 16:00Dell EMC Solutions, in partnership with Intel, are providing the infrastructure to enable a broader definition of HPCAdnan Khaleel and Monika Gupta, Dell/EMC 18:00 EXHIBIT CLOSES 18:00 TIMETopicHost/Speakers Guest TUESDAY, June 26th – Industrial Day 10:40Recent advances in OSPRay rendering in ParaViewDavid Demarle,Michael Miglioreand Joachim Pouderoux,Kitware SAS 16:40True HPC Cloud (IaaS): The Holy Grail of HPCGisli Kr. and Jon Thor Kristinsson,Advania Intel is excited to be a part of ISC High Performance 2018 in Frankfurt, Germany, June 25–28. ISC brings together academic and commercial disciplines to share knowledge in the field of high performance computing. Our presence at the event will include keynotes, sessions, and booth demos that will be focused on the future of HPC technology, including Artificial Intelligence (AI) and visualization. Also featured in the Intel booth: The Intel Collaboration Hub hosting eight in-booth panel discussions and 25 Intel and partner presentations.Throughout Intel’s presence at ISC, we will showcase how the industry and the world are entering an advanced era of HPC that now includes AI technologies. The data and algorithmic innovations powered with deep learning have led to a sharp increase in the need for compute. As deep learning and other AI techniques evolve with massive data sets and image sizes, they will continue to require high compute power that scales to the size of HPC infrastructures. Intel will showcase how it’s helping AI developers, data scientists and HPC programmers transform industries such as healthcare, retail and finance by tapping into HPC to power the AI solutions of today and the future.Let’s take a look at a few key sessions and demos presented by Intel. We’ll also discuss where and how to engage with Intel at the show.Key Intel SessionsKeynote: Supercomputing Circa 2025Dr. Raj Hazra, Corporate Vice President at Intel, will discuss emerging technologies that will accelerate discovery and innovation. The convergence of AI, analytics and simulation and modeling provide new opportunities and challenges for every organization and will require new system architecture for HPC. Dr. Hazra will explore new system level architecture approaches that will help global HPC leaders reach new breakthroughs in system performance and capabilities.Speaker: Raj Hazra, Corporate Vice President at IntelDate: Monday, June 25, 2018Time: 6:00 to 6:45 p.m.Location: Panorama 2, ForumKeynote at the HP-CAST Event: New Era in HPCTrish Damkroger, Vice President, Data Center Group, General Manager, Technical Computing Initiative, Enterprise and Government at Intel will keynote at the HP-CAST, HPE’s user group meeting for high performance computing on the New Era in HPC. She will discuss the changing landscape of technical computing, key trends in HPC, and the convergence of HPC-AI-HPDA that is transforming the industry and ensuring technical computing continues to fulfill its potential as a scientific tool for insight and innovation. Trish will also provide an overview of Intel’s technical computing strategy, products, and ecosystem collaborations that are driving this transformation.Speaker: Trish Damkroger, Vice President, Data Center Group, General Manager, Technical Computing Initiative, Enterprise and Government at IntelThis keynote will take place at the HP-CAST event.Machine Learning Day at ISCWithin the last few years, machine learning has become a vital topic within the HPC community. Vendors see the development as an opportunity to expand their high-performance solutions into a new and fast-growing market, and traditional HPC users are incorporating these techniques into their workflows to speed processing and extract greater insights. ISC High Performance will provide a special focus on this subject matter with a one-day track on Wednesday, June 27, where Pradeep Dubey, Intel Fellow at Intel Labs and the Director of the Parallel Computing Lab, will speak in the following session:Session: On Scale-out Deep Learning Training for Cloud and HPCPradeep Dubey, Intel Fellow at Intel Labs and the Director of the Parallel Computing Lab will be one of the featured speakers for Machine Learning Day at ISC. He will discuss how the exponential growth of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Deep Learning (DL) has accelerated the need for training deep neural networks in hours or even minutes. This can only be achieved through scalable and efficient distributed training, since a single node/card cannot satisfy the compute, memory, and I/O requirements of today’s state-of-the-art neural networks. However, scaling Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) is still a challenging problem and requires continued research/development. This entails innovations spanning algorithms, frameworks, communication libraries, and system design. In this talk, Pradeep will describe the philosophy, design, and implementation of Intel Machine Learning Scalability Library (MLSL), support in popular DL frameworks, and present proof-points demonstrating scaling DL training on 100s to 1000s of nodes across Cloud and HPC systems.Speaker: Pradeep Dubey, Intel Fellow at Intel LabsSession: Scalable Machine Learning SystemsTime: Wednesday, June 27, 1:45 to 2:15 p.m.Location: Panorama 2Intel booth activities located in Messe Frankfurt, Hall 3 (upper level) F-930The Intel Collaboration Hub, located inside the Intel booth, will be the place to get updates from Intel, meet experts, experience panel discussions, and see the latest from Intel. Below are two panel discussion highlights. Click the link below to see the full schedule:Panel: Intel® Select Solutions – Intro to Professional Visualization Hosts: Jeff Jeffers, Senior Director, Senior Principle Engineer, Visualization Engineering at Intel; Ullrich Becker-Lemgau, Technical Marketing Engineer, Intel; and Werner Krotz-Vogel, Technical Marketing Manager, IntelTime: 11 a.m.Location: Intel Collaboration Hub inside the Intel boothPanel: Convergence of AI and HPCHost: Binay Ackalloor, Director, Business Development, Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning at IntelTime: 12 p.m.Location: Intel Collaboration Hub inside the Intel boothPlease see the full schedule of the Intel Collaboration Hub speakers and panels below. Intel ISC Booth DemosDemo: AI on IA—Brain Tumor SegmentationSee an interactive demo of a solution built by Intel to help identify brain tumors. This solution uses deep CNNs to segment brain tumors in 2D MRI images, using 2016 Brain and Tumor Segmentation (BraTS) dataset and containing 31,000 2D MRI scans at 240×240 pixel resolution. Each brain has 255 slices, and the dataset represents ~120 individuals. Intel will deliver a flexible deployment architecture that provides great performance and T.C.O for GE Imaging C.T. group to deliver deep learning applications for their imaging modalities. The result is a trained model that is able to segment brain tumors just as well as a neuroradiologist. Intel then passes along the final MRI images and segmentation maps to EchoPixel* for visualization.Demo: Defined VisualizationSee the latest Intel® Select Solution that uses software-defined visualization and state-of-the-art Intel ingredients for modeling with visualization of even the most complex and large data sizes. The demo will showcase automotive CFD Analysis with OpenFOAM*, ParaView v5.5* using OSPRay* to demonstrate high visual fidelity of software-defined visualization using ray tracing to display an animation of airflow over a moving vehicle.Demo: Application Acceleration with FPGA This demo is built around the Intel® Programmable Acceleration Card with Intel® Arria® 10 GX FPGA (Intel® PAC with Intel® Arria® 10 GX FPGA) and demonstrates how FPG-based processing provides high performance and low power. See how to dynamically configure an FPGA to run multiple functions or workloads using partial reconfiguration. The workloads run on the FPGA will be file compression, genome sequencing, image recognition, and video segmentation. The demo will use the Intel® PAC with Intel® Arria 10 GX FPGA, a robust collection of software, firmware, and tools to make it easier to use Intel® FPGAs for workload optimization. The Acceleration Stack abstracts the FPGA design, enabling software application developers to leverage the benefits of FPGAs.Demo: Distributed Deep Reinforcement Learning on CPUAn Adam optimization algorithm with a batch size of up to 2048 is a viable choice for carrying out large scale machine learning computations. See how this optimization is used to train an Atari agent to play games, which resulted in substantially decreasing the training time. The results were collected using a multi-node Intel® Xeon® processor-based cluster (formerly codenamed Haswell) and the optimized TensorFlow* for Intel® architecture. We will demonstrate the progress of the training model, including detailed hardware configuration and software stack, as well as visualization of all critical parameters of the training algorithm and their progress over time.At ISC, see how Intel is leading the way in the convergence of AI and HPC, and partnering with organizations to create solutions that are solving the problems of today and tomorrow. You can engage with us in various sessions (see the ISC schedule) and in the Intel booth (Messe Frankfurt, Hall 3 (upper level) F-930). You can also follow and engage with us on social media @IntelHPC and follow the #ISC18 hashtag.The full Intel Collaboration Hub schedule (taking place in Messe Frankfurt, Hall 3 (upper level) F-930):  17:40Exploiting HPC Technologies to Accelerate Big Data Processing and Associated Deep LearningDhabaleswar Panda and Xiaoyi Lu, Ohio State University WEDNESDAY, June 27th – Machine Learning Day 13:20Scaling up Deep Learning on SupercomputersDamian Podareanu, Valeriu Codreanu, SURFsaraVikram Saletore,Intel 13:00TAU Performance System and TAU Commander*Sameer Shende,University of Oregon 13:00VENDOR SHOWDOWN (in Panorama 3)Nash Palaniswamy 10:20Moving to Skylake and Beyond with the latest Intel® Compilers v19.0Keith Perrin, MSC Software 18:00 EXHIBIT CLOSES 18:00 11:20Moving to Skylake and Beyond with the Latest Intel Compilers v19.0Fabio Baruffa,Intel 14:00Next Generation MPI – Intel® MPI Library 2019 Technical PreviewDmitry Durnov and Mike Lee, Intel 16:20Interactive Supercomputing to Enable Machine Learning at Lincoln LaboratoryAlbert Reuther,Massachusetts Institute of Technology 10:00EXHIBIT HALL OPENS 10:00 a.m. 16:0016:2016:40OpenMP Panel: API Version 5.0 is Knocking at your Door – Grill the ARBMike Klemm, Intel Host Christian Terboven, RWTH AachenMartin Schulz, Technical University of MunichBarbara Chapman, Stony Brook UniversityXavier Teruel, Barcelona Supercomputing Center 15:40BigDL: Distributed Deep Learning on Apache Spark*Michael Steyer, Intellast_img read more

Cloned Mice Die Young

first_imgSince 1997, when Dolly the sheep became the first animal cloned from an adult cell, evidence has been mounting that cloning creates problems. For example, cloned cows have faulty immune systems, and cloned mice grow obese and exhibit other abnormalities. Now a group in Japan has shown for the first time that clones die younger than animals created by old-fashioned sexual reproduction.A team in the laboratory of Atsuo Ogura at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Shinjuku, Tokyo, cloned 12 mice by removing nuclei from testis cells and inserting them into enucleated egg cells. They compared these mice to a genetically similar group created by natural mating. The cloned mice started dying off at the age of 311 days–about half the age the normal mice began their decline, the group reports in the 11 February online version of Nature Genetics. By 800 days, 10 of the 12 clones were dead, whereas about 80% of the normal mice were still alive. Postmortem exams of six cloned mice revealed that they all had severe pneumonia. Four also had extensive liver necrosis, and two had cancer–leukemia in one case, lung cancer in the other.The authors say their study offers further evidence that clones are likely to have a variety of impairments. It also suggests that the type of impairments clones experience may depend on what kind of body cells are used as donor cells. Unlike previous mice created with the nuclei of cumulus cells–cells that surround and nourish eggs–the mice that Ogura’s group used did not become obese.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)All these problems suggest that in cloning, the donor nucleus is not properly reprogrammed to resemble that of a freshly fertilized egg, says developmental biologist Davor Solter of the Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology in Freiburg, Germany. The chances that “one lucky clone will by accident have all its genes correctly reprogrammed,” he says, are minuscule.last_img read more

Good Day at the Office (of Science)

first_imgThe Department of Energy’s Office of Science comes out a big winner in the draft budget for 2009 formulated by the U.S. Congress yesterday. But a closer look shows that the 20%, $800 million increase to $4.77 billion would only make up for cuts made in last year’s budget and that one major item—the U.S. contribution to the international fusion experiment ITER to be built in Cadarache, France—would remain funded at just over half the requested amount.To be sure, the numbers released yesterday will be welcomed by many researchers at the Office of Science’s 10 national labs. Some of those labs were rocked by last-minute cuts in DOE’s 2008 science budget that played havoc with three of the office’s six programs. In particular, last year, DOE’s fusion energy sciences program saw its budget slashed from the $428 million requested by the Administration of then-president George W. Bush to $287 million in the omnibus budget passed by Congress in December 2007—including a cut of all $149 million for the United States’s 2008 contribution to ITER.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Similarly, last year the high-energy physics program saw its budget cut from $752 million in 2007 to $688 million, a reduction that led to furloughs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, and the threat of layoffs there that was averted only when Congress gave the lab another $32 million last July. DOE’s basic energy sciences program, which supports research in condensed-matter physics, materials science, and related fields, received $1.27 billion last year, instead of the $1.50 billion requested, which led to major reductions in running time at its x-ray sources and other “user facilities.”The numbers are much higher this time—and ironically, they are very close to those requested by the Bush Administration last February in its final budget. According to the draft legislation, high-energy physics would get $796 million, just $9 million shy of the requested amount. Basic energy science would get $1.572 billion, $4 million more than the Bush Administration requested.The biological and environmental research program would do even better. It would receive $602 million, $33 million more than originally requested. The broad and multifaceted program also receives some unambiguous direction from Congress, which wants the program run as two subprograms: one focused on using biological means to produce energy and clean up the environment and the other focused on climate change. DOE’s nuclear physics and advance scientific computing programs would get $512 million and $369 million—almost exactly what the Bush Administration requested. The only program that would come up dramatically short is fusion energy sciences, which, at $403 million, would get $90 million less than requested. All of that would come out of the U.S. contribution to ITER: DOE had requested $214 million; Congress has allotted $124 million. Luckily for ITER researchers, the price of steel has fallen precipitously in recent months, so their money may go further than expected. DOE also has $1.6 billion from the economic stimulus bill signed into law last week to play with.ITER researchers can take solace in the fact that every congressional budget cloud has a hickory-smoked lining: The draft DOE science budget also contains 68 earmarks worth $94 million.last_img read more

Another Five Years for the Space Station?

first_imgJean-Jacques Dordain, director of the European Space Agency (ESA) has called for the backers of the international space station (ISS) to keep it flying beyond 2015, when current funding runs out, until at least 2020. ISS will finally be completed this year and once the last shuttle has flown (also this year) only Russia will be able to carry astronauts into orbit. NASA has made no commitment to support the station after 2015, but that decision is awaiting the results of a human spaceflight review ordered by President Barack Obama. “I am convinced that stopping the station in 2015 would be a mistake because we cannot attract the best scientists if we are telling them today, ‘You are welcome on the space station but you’d better be quick because in 2015 we close the shop,’ ” Dourdain told a press conference yesterday.last_img read more

Peace in Our Time

first_imgThe acrimonious battle between the Royal Institution of Great Britain and its former Director Susan Greenfield has apparently ended. The two parties today released a statement announcing that they had agreed upon the terms of Greenfield’s departure, and a Royal Institution spokesperson said that the neuroscientist would no longer be pursuing a wrongful termination claim.last_img

Poll: Mexicans Express Belief in Spirits, Not Science

first_imgMexicans put too much faith in magic and too little in science, according to a survey of public perception of science and technology. According to the poll, about half the country’s citizens also believe scientists are “dangerous.” The study, compiled annually by the National Council on Science and Technology and the National Institute of Statistics and Geography, indicates that a large percentage of Mexicans give credence to homeopathy, acupuncture, spiritual cleansing, lucky numbers, and ESP. Approximately 38% also believe that “space vehicles from other civilizations” visit Earth. To be sure, Mexicans are aware that their faith in otherworldly forces may be a problem. About 83.6% agreed with the statement, “We believe too much in faith and too little in science.” Most think the country needs more scientists. The results are considered worrisome. As in other Latin American nations, scientists in Mexico fret that economic development is limited by low investment in R&D. Rosaura Ruiz, director of the faculty of science at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, told El Universal newspaper that Mexicans’ faith in magic “might be laughable except that it is desperately grave for national development.” The Mexican poll uses many of the same questions asked by researchers in surveys of American adults funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). NSF’s results indicate that Americans have a better grasp of scientific facts than Mexicans but are only slightly less credulous. About a third of Americans also think UFOs are real, and a similar percentage believes that astrology is “very scientific” or “sort of scientific.” According to the Mexican poll, scientists are both feared and respected, perhaps not unlike the Aztec priests of old. In the survey, 57% of Mexicans interviewed agreed that “due to their knowledge, scientific researchers have power which makes them dangerous.” *This item has been corrected, 11:00 a.m. on 5 January. The original version of this article mischaracterized a U.S. survey of public attitudes towards science. The results are gathered by independent researcher organizations and reported by NSF bienially, not annually.last_img read more

Royal Society 2011 Award Recipients Announced

first_imgToday, the U.K. Royal Society announced the recipients of its awards, medals, and prize lectures for 2011. Among the winning scientists, recognized for their achievements in fields ranging from organic chemistry to “mathematical population biology of immunology,” is Christopher Lintott, a postdoc at the University of Oxford and one of the founders of Galaxy Zoo (an online crowdsourcing initiative inviting the public to help in classifying galaxies), who received the Kohn Award for his work with the social aspects of science. The society’s premier award, the Copley Medal, along with £5000, goes to Dan McKenzie of the University of Cambridge, for contributions to the understanding of geophysical phenomena such as plate tectonics. In studies that have taken him to Albania, India, and Iceland, he has studied the structure of the planet’s crust and how the mantle melts.last_img read more

In Italy, Academe Is a Family Business

first_imgIt’s no secret that nepotism plays an important role in Italy’s academic world. In a paper published yesterday in PLoS ONE, Stefano Allesina of the University of Chicago’s Computation Institute presents an original way to gauge the extent of the problem: a statistical analysis of the names and academic affiliations of more than 60,000 tenured professors in Italy. His findings, detailed in a blog post at ScienceCareers, aren’t pretty: A theoretical ecologist, Allesina approached the problem in a way that is “akin to computing how many species of trees we should find in a quadrant given the frequency of the species in a forest,” he says. Correcting for natural name distribution in Italy, Allesina asked how many last names one should expect to find in a particular discipline if the names were selected randomly, and compared this number to the real-life number. Allesina found “a severe paucity of names,” which was most pronounced in engineering, law, medicine, geography, and pedagogy and also in the South of Italy. “The probability that the recruitment was fair is extremely low,” Allesina says. Read the whole story here. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Adult Killer Whales Need Their Mamas

first_imgDespite their fierce name, killer whales are really mama’s boys. For good reason: A study of almost 600 orcas, also known as killer whales, shows that having mom nearby significantly increases a son’s chances for survival. For the killer whale moms, too, more than just motherly love is at work: An innate drive to ensure she has as many descendants as possible may compel her to look out for her adult young. The evolutionary benefit of keeping watch over her descendants may help explain why female killer whales, like humans and pilot whale females, live decades past their reproductive prime. The idea that mothers live much longer than needed for reproduction in order to help their children have more children dates back almost 50 years. Studies in hunter-gatherer and other societies show that having an older female around improves the survival of her descendents, including the grandchildren. Some researchers even argue that evolution favors menopause and a prolonged postreproductive lifespan—but that idea is controversial. Killer whales can live into their 90s, but females stop reproducing in their 30s or 40s. They and pilot whales are the only two animal species, aside from humans, known to undergo menopause. Like humans, orcas live in complex social groups that include their sons and daughters. “They make good proxies for understanding” what the advantages of having human grandmothers might be, says Robert Pitman, a marine ecologist at the National Marine Fisheries Service in San Diego, California, who was not involved with the study. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Beginning in the 1970s, researchers started tracking the killer whales that lived in the Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Washington and British Columbia. The scientists took pictures of the whales’ dorsal fins—which are as unique as fingerprints—and used them to track the creatures’ births and deaths. By 2010, the survey included 589 individuals. Biologist Darren Croft from the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom and his colleagues analyzed these data using algorithms similar to those used by insurance companies to calculate life insurance premiums, and came up with the probability of survival of each whale at any age. They then did separate calculations for orcas whose mothers had died and for those who still had mothers. Losing a mother, they found, was a liability, particularly for sons. Young males were three times more likely to die the year after their mother’s death than were males whose mothers were still around. Males over 30 years old were even more vulnerable: Their risk of death increased more than eightfold, Croft and his colleagues report today in Science. Young daughters did just fine after losing their moms, but older daughters were 2.7 times more likely to die. “For them, just like us, family matters,” Pitman says. The researchers don’t know why having mothers around benefits the sons more than the daughters. It could be that mothers assist in hunting or fighting off aggressive whales. “It would be great if we knew more about orca social behavior, in particular just what benefits mothers are conferring,” notes Michael Cant, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Exeter who was not involved with the work. “But working on cetaceans is just enormously challenging, and this is very rare, hard-won data.”last_img read more

India Readies Hi-tech Naval Base to Keep Eye on China

first_imgThe strategic base, with an eye firmly on China, will eventually even have underground pens or bunkers to protect nuclear submarines both from spy satellites and enemy air attacks. Related Itemslast_img

Blackstone Sees Indian Commercial Real Estate Turnaround

first_imgThe company has invested $1 billion in commercial real estate across India to become the largest landlord in the country among private-equity investors Related Itemslast_img